Angiomyolipoma classification

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] Associate Editor-In-Chief: Cafer Zorkun, M.D., Ph.D. [2], Faizan Sheraz, M.D. [3],Rekha, M.D.

Overview

Angiomyolipoma may be classified according to radiologic appearance into 7 subtypes: classic angiomyolipoma, triphasic angiomyolipoma, fat poor angiomyolipoma, hyperattenuating angiomyolipoma, isoattenuating angiomyolipoma, angiomyolipoma with epithelial cysts, and angiomyolipoma in lymphangioleiomyomatosis.[1]

Classification

Angiomyolipoma may be classified according to World Health Organization (WHO) into as follows:[1][2][3][4]




Radiologic Classification Features

Classic angiomyolipoma

Triphasic angiomyolipoma

Fat poor angiomyolipoma

Hyperattenuating angiomyolipoma

  • Abundant smooth muscle component
  • Hyperattenuating tissue

Isoattenuating angiomyolipoma

  • Scattered fat tissue
  • Smooth muscle component

Angiomyolipoma with epithelial cysts

Angiomyolipoma in lymphangioleiomyomatosis

  • Atypical smooth muscle component
  • Cystic changes

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Jinzaki M, Silverman SG, Akita H, Nagashima Y, Mikami S, Oya M (2014). "Renal angiomyolipoma: a radiological classification and update on recent developments in diagnosis and management". Abdom Imaging. 39 (3): 588–604. doi:10.1007/s00261-014-0083-3. PMC 4040184. PMID 24504542.
  2. Lane BR, Aydin H, Danforth TL, Zhou M, Remer EM, Novick AC; et al. (2008). "Clinical correlates of renal angiomyolipoma subtypes in 209 patients: classic, fat poor, tuberous sclerosis associated and epithelioid". J Urol. 180 (3): 836–43. doi:10.1016/j.juro.2008.05.041. PMID 18635231.
  3. Park, Byung Kwan (2017). "Renal Angiomyolipoma: Radiologic Classification and Imaging Features According to the Amount of Fat". American Journal of Roentgenology. 209 (4): 826–835. doi:10.2214/AJR.17.17973. ISSN 0361-803X.
  4. Silverman, Stuart G.; Mortele, Koenraad J.; Tuncali, Kemal; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Cibas, Edmund S. (2007). "Hyperattenuating Renal Masses: Etiologies, Pathogenesis, and Imaging Evaluation". RadioGraphics. 27 (4): 1131–1143. doi:10.1148/rg.274065147. ISSN 0271-5333.

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