Onchocerciasis historical perspective

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Kalsang Dolma, M.B.B.S.[2]

Overview

Dr. Rodolfo Robles Valverde's study on patients with river blindness in Guatemala led to the discovery that the disease is caused by filaria of O. volvulus, and sheds light on the life cycle and transmission of the parasite.

Historical Perspective

In 1915, Dr. Rodolfo Robles Valverde's study on patients with river blindness in Guatemala led to the discovery that the disease is caused by filaria of O. volvulus, and sheds light on the life cycle and transmission of the parasite.[1] Using case studies of coffee plantation workers in Guatemala, Robles hypothesized the vector of the disease is a day-biting insect, and more specifically, two anthropophilic species of Simulium flies found to be endemic to the areas. He published his findings on a new disease from Guatemala associated with subcutaneous nodules, anterior ocular (eye) lesions, dermatitis, and microfilariae in 1917.[2]

References

  1. Marty AM, Duke BOL, Neafie RC. Onchocerciasis in Meyers, W., Neafie, RC; Marty AM; Wear DJ. Pathology of Infectious Diseases, Volume 1 Helminths, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, ISBN 1-88101041-65-4, 2000 p. 287 - 306 (17)
  2. ROBLES R. Enfermedad nueva en Guatemala. La Juventud Médica 1917; 17: 97-115.

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