Oliguria (patient information)

Jump to: navigation, search

Oliguria

Overview

What are the causes?

Who is at highest risk?

When to seek urgent medical care?

Diagnosis

Treatment options

Where to find medical care for Oliguria?

What to expect (Outlook/Prognosis)?

Possible complications

Prevention

Oliguria On the Web

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

Images of Oliguria

Videos on Oliguria

FDA on Oliguria

CDC on Oliguria

Oliguria in the news

Blogs on Oliguria

Directions to Hospitals Treating Oliguria

Risk calculators and risk factors for Oliguria

For the WikiDoc page for this topic, click here

Editors-in-Chief:C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D.; Associate Editor-In-Chief: Ujjwal Rastogi, MBBS [1]

Overview

Decreased urine output is defined as producing less than 500 milliliters of urine in 24 hours.

What causes Oliguria?

Who is at highest risk?

Patient having any of the conditions mentioned in the causes are at risk of oliguria.

When to seek urgent medical care?

Contact your health care provider if you have:

Diagnosis

The health care provider will perform a physical exam and ask questions about your medical history and symptoms, including:

  • Time pattern
    • When did this begin?
    • Did it occur suddenly?
    • Has it rapidly become worse?
  • Quality
    • How much do you drink each day?
    • Does drinking more increase your urine output?
    • How much urine do you produce each day?
    • What color is the urine?
  • Aggravating factors
    • Has there been fever?
    • Has there been diarrhea?
    • Has there been vomiting? With or without nausea?
    • Is thirst decreased?
    • What other symptoms do you have?
  • Other
    • What medications do you take?
    • Do you have any allergies?
    • Do you have access to adequate fluids?
  • Medical history
    • Have you had any recent injuries such as burns?
    • Have you been sick?
    • Do you have a history of a problem with your kidneys or bladder?

Tests that may be done include:

  • Blood studies to monitor electrolytes and kidney function
  • CT (cat) scan of the abdomen
  • Intravenous pyelogram (IVP)
  • Renal scan
  • Abdominal ultrasound
  • Urine tests, including tests for infection

Treatment options

The treatment mainly depends on the cause.

Home Care

Follow prescribed fluid regimens and measure urine output as directed.

Medications to avoid

Patients diagnosed with anuria should avoid using the following medications:


Where to find medical care for Oliguria?

Directions to Hospitals Treating Acute tubular necrosis

What to expect (Outlook/Prognosis)?

Prognosis depends on the cause of oliguria.

Possible complications

Although a significant decrease in urine output may indicate a serious, even life-threatening condition, adequate urine output can be restored with prompt medical treatment.

Prevention

Prevention depends on the underlying cause.

References

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003147.htm



Linked-in.jpg