HIV AIDS chest x ray

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor-in-Chief:Serge Korjian M.D.

Overview

Chest X-ray findings in HIV/AIDS are related to the development of opportunistic lung infections. They include ground-glass infiltrates suggestive of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, lobar consolidation, pleural effusions, loculated empyemas, and lymphadenopathy.

Chest X Ray Findings

Chest X-ray findings in HIV/AIDS are related to the development of opportunistic lung infections. Common findings include:[1]

  • Diffuse ground-glass infiltrates
  • Suggestive of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia
  • Nodular infiltrates
  • Suggestive of bacterial or fungal pneumonia
  • Lobar/segmental consolidation
  • Suggestive of bacterial or fungal pneumonia
  • Pleural effusion
  • Suggestive of empyema, parapneumonic effusion, tuberculous effusion, and malignant effusion
  • Lobar consolidation
  • Suggestive of bacterial or fungal pneumonia
  • Hilar lymphadenopathy
  • Suggestive of tuberculosis, malignancy, or may be secondary to HIV induced lymphadenopathy
  • Cavitation
  • Suggestive of tuberculosis, fungal infection, or necrotizing pneumonia
  • Mass lesion
  • Suggestive of malignancy, tuberculosis, or fungal infection
Chest X-ray of an individual with Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia[2]

References

  1. Allen CM, Al-Jahdali HH, Irion KL, Al Ghanem S, Gouda A, Khan AN (2010). "Imaging lung manifestations of HIV/AIDS". Ann Thorac Med. 5 (4): 201–16. doi:10.4103/1817-1737.69106. PMC 2954374. PMID 20981180.
  2. Castro JG, Morrison-Bryant M (2010). "Management of Pneumocystis Jirovecii pneumonia in HIV infected patients: current options, challenges and future directions". HIV AIDS (Auckl). 2: 123–34. PMC 3218692. PMID 22096390.

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