HIV AIDS physical examination

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editors-in-Chief: Ujjwal Rastogi, MBBS; Ammu Susheela, M.D. [2]; Jesus Rosario Hernandez, M.D. [3]

Overview

The physical examination of a patient with HIV/AIDS can be variable depending on the stage of the disease. Physical exam findings may be related to the virus itself or secondary to the opportunistic infections of late disease. Findings include fever, lymphadenopathy, rash, oral thrush, retinal infiltrates, crackles on auscultation, and focal neurologic deficits.

Physical Examination

General Appearance of the patient

The appearance of the patient depends on the stage of the disease. The patient may look very healthy or be ill-looking and cachectic.[1]

Vitals

Temperature
Pulse
Blood pressure
Respiratory rate

Skin

Eyes

  • Retinal hemorrhage may be present.
  • Retinal infiltrates may be present.

Head

Nose

Ears

  • Unilateral or bilateral deafness may be present.
  • Discharge from the ears may be found.

Throat

  • Peridontal disease may be present.
  • Oral herpes simplex lesions may be found.
  • Oral thrush may be found.

Lungs

Cardiovascular system

Abdomen

Genitourinary

  • Vaginal or urethral discharge can be present.

Extremities

Central Nervous System

  • Focal neurological deficits may be found.
  • Behavioral changes may be observed.
  • Gait disturbances may be present.

Gallery

References

  1. "AIDSinfo".
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 "Public Health Image Library (PHIL)".

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