Central pontine myelinolysis historical perspective

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Mohamadmostafa Jahansouz M.D.[2]

Overview

Central pontine myelinolysis was first discovered by Raymond Delacy Adams, an an American neurologist, in 1959. Raymond Delacy Adams and colleagues observed a rapidly evolving quadriplegia and pseudobulbar palsy in a young alcoholic man whose postmortem examination showed a large, symmetrical, essentially demyelinative lesion occupying the greater part of the base of the pons In 1950.

Historical Perspective

Discovery

  • Central pontine myelinolysis was first discovered by Raymond Delacy Adams, an an American neurologist, in 1959.[1][2][3][4]
  • Raymond Delacy Adams and colleagues observed a rapidly evolving quadriplegia and pseudobulbar palsy in a young alcoholic man whose postmortem examination showed a large, symmetrical, essentially demyelinative lesion occupying the greater part of the base of the pons In 1950.[2][3][4]

References

  1. Fisher CM (2010). "Dr. Raymond Delacy Adams (1911-2008): an appreciation". Neurologist. 16 (3): 141–2. doi:10.1097/NRL.0b013e3181c9280a. PMID 20445423.
  2. 2.0 2.1 ADAMS RD, VICTOR M, MANCALL EL (1959). "Central pontine myelinolysis: a hitherto undescribed disease occurring in alcoholic and malnourished patients". AMA Arch Neurol Psychiatry. 81 (2): 154–72. PMID 13616772.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Mohammed AS, Boddu P, Yazdani DF (2016). "Clinical Evolution of Central Pontine Myelinolysis in a Patient with Alcohol Withdrawal: A Blurred Clinical Horizon". Case Rep Med. 2016: 6065259. doi:10.1155/2016/6065259. PMC 5004014. PMID 27610136.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Kumar S, Fowler M, Gonzalez-Toledo E, Jaffe SL (2006). "Central pontine myelinolysis, an update". Neurol Res. 28 (3): 360–6. doi:10.1179/016164106X110346. PMID 16687066.



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