Bicuspid aortic stenosis MRI

Jump to: navigation, search

Bicuspid aortic stenosis Microchapters

Home

Patient Info

Overview

Anatomy

Historical Perspective

Pathophysiology

Epidemiology & Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Causes of Bicuspid aortic stenosis

Natural History, Complications & Prognosis

Diagnosis

History & Symptoms

Physical Examination

Lab Tests

Electrocardiogram

Chest X Ray

CT

MRI

Echocardiography

Cardiac Catheterization

Treatment

Overview

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Bicuspid aortic stenosis MRI On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Bicuspid aortic stenosis MRI

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Bicuspid aortic stenosis MRI

CDC on Bicuspid aortic stenosis MRI

Bicuspid aortic stenosis MRI in the news

Blogs on Bicuspid aortic stenosis MRI

Directions to Hospitals Treating Bicuspid aortic stenosis

Risk calculators and risk factors for Bicuspid aortic stenosis MRI

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-In-Chief: Varun Kumar, M.B.B.S. [2]; Usama Talib, BSc, MD [3]

Overview

Magnetic resonance imaging can be helpful as a diagnostic tool in conditions where the echocardiographic findings are inconclusive.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Bicuspid aortic valves are often associated with dilatation of the aortic root or ascending thoracic aorta, which can lead to aortic aneurysm or aortic dissection.[1][2] Visualization of mid aorta may be difficult with echocardiography and during such instances, MRI or CT are helpful to evaluate for aneurysm or dissection in aorta.[3]

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used as a diagnostic modality in aortic stenosis.

Advantages of using MRI include:

  • It can be used in cases where echocardiographic results are inconclusive.
  • Helps in measuring heart volumes, blood flow and ventricular wall thickness.
  • The magnetic resonance angiography helps in better visualization of heart vasculature.
  • Phase velocity mapping helps in measuring the ratio of pulmonary to systemic blood flow (Qp:Qs).

2008 and Incorporated 2006 ACC/AHA Guidelines for the Management of Patients with Valvular Heart Disease (DO NOT EDIT) [4]

Cardiac MRI (DO NOT EDIT) [4]

Class I
"1. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging or cardiac computed tomography is indicated in patients with bicuspid aortic valves when morphology of the aortic root or ascending aorta cannot be assessed accurately by echocardiography. (Level of Evidence: C)"
"2. Patients with bicuspid aortic valves and dilatation of the aortic root or ascending aorta (diameter > 4.0 cm*) should undergo serial evaluation of aortic root/ascending aorta size and morphology by echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance, or computed tomography on a yearly basis. (Level of Evidence: C)"
Class IIa
"1. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging or cardiac computed tomography is reasonable in patients with bicuspid aortic valves when aortic root dilatation is detected by echocardiography to further quantify severity of dilatation and involvement of the ascending aorta. (Level of Evidence: B)"
* Consider lower threshold values for patients of small stature of either gender.

Sources

  • 2008 Focused Update Incorporated Into the ACC/AHA 2006 Guidelines for the Management of Patients With Valvular Heart Disease [4]

References

  1. Nistri S, Sorbo MD, Marin M, Palisi M, Scognamiglio R, Thiene G (1999). "Aortic root dilatation in young men with normally functioning bicuspid aortic valves". Heart (British Cardiac Society). 82 (1): 19–22. PMC 1729087. PMID 10377302. Retrieved 2012-04-11. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)
  2. Niwa K, Perloff JK, Bhuta SM, Laks H, Drinkwater DC, Child JS, Miner PD (2001). "Structural abnormalities of great arterial walls in congenital heart disease: light and electron microscopic analyses". Circulation. 103 (3): 393–400. PMID 11157691. Retrieved 2012-04-11. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)
  3. Isselbacher EM (2005). "Thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms". Circulation. 111 (6): 816–28. doi:10.1161/01.CIR.0000154569.08857.7A. PMID 15710776. Retrieved 2012-04-11. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Bonow RO, Carabello BA, Chatterjee K; et al. (2008). "2008 Focused update incorporated into the ACC/AHA 2006 guidelines for the management of patients with valvular heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines (Writing Committee to Revise the 1998 Guidelines for the Management of Patients With Valvular Heart Disease): endorsed by the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons". Circulation. 118 (15): e523–661. doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.108.190748. PMID 18820172. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)


Cardiology


Linked-in.jpg