Alzheimer's disease major or mild Neurocognitive Disorder

Jump to: navigation, search

Alzheimer's disease Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Alzheimer's disease from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

Diagnostic Criteria

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Electrocardiogram

X-ray

Ultrasound

CT scan

MRI

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Future or Investigational Therapies

Social Impact

Family Impact

Alzheimer's disease major or mild Neurocognitive Disorder On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Alzheimer's disease major or mild Neurocognitive Disorder

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Alzheimer's disease major or mild Neurocognitive Disorder

CDC on Alzheimer's disease major or mild Neurocognitive Disorder

Alzheimer's disease major or mild Neurocognitive Disorder in the news

Blogs on Alzheimer's disease major or mild Neurocognitive Disorder

Directions to Hospitals Treating Alzheimer's disease

Risk calculators and risk factors for Alzheimer's disease major or mild Neurocognitive Disorder

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Kiran Singh, M.D. [2]

Diagnostic Criteria

DSM-V Diagnostic Criteria for Major or Mild Neurocognitive Disorder Due to Alzheimer’s Disease[1]

  • A.The criteria are met for major or mild neurocognitive disorder.

AND

  • B.There is insidious onset and gradual progression of impairment in one or more cognitive domains (for major neurocognitive disorder, at least two domains must be impaired).

AND

  • C.Criteria are met for either probable or possible Alzheimer’s disease as follows:

For major neurocognitive disorder:

Probable Alzheimer’s disease is diagnosed if either of the following is present; otherwise,possible Alzheimer’s disease should be diagnosed.

  • 1.Evidence of a causative Alzheimer’s disease genetic mutation from family history or genetic testing.
  • 2.All three of the following are present:
  • a.Clear evidence of decline in memory and learning and at least one other cognitive domain (based on detailed history or serial neuropsychological testing).
  • b.Steadily progressive, gradual decline in cognition, without extended plateaus.
  • c.No evidence of mixed etiology (i.e., absence of other neurodegenerative or cerebrovascular disease, or another neurological, mental, or systemic disease or condition likely contributing to cognitive decline).

For mild neurocognitive disorder:

Probable Alzheimer’s disease is diagnosed if there is evidence of a causative Alzheimer’s disease genetic mutation from either genetic testing or family history.

Possible Alzheimer’s disease is diagnosed if there is no evidence of a causative Alzheimer’s disease genetic mutation from either genetic testing or family history, and all three of the following are present:

  • 1.Clear evidence of decline in memory and learning.
  • 2.Steadily progressive, gradual decline in cognition, without extended plateaus.
  • 3.No evidence of mixed etiology (i.e., absence of other neurodegenerative or cerebrovascular disease, or another neurological or systemic disease or condition likely contributing to cognitive decline).

AND

  • D. The disturbance is not better explained by cerebrovascular disease, another neurodegenerative disease, the effects of a substance, or another mental, neurological, or systemic disorder.

References

  1. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders : DSM-5. Washington, D.C: American Psychiatric Association. 2013. ISBN 0890425558.

Linked-in.jpg