Acute brachial neuritis medical therapy

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Acute brachial neuritis Microchapters

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Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Acute brachial neuritis from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

History and Symptoms

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Laboratory Findings

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Treatment

Medical Therapy

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Case #1

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

Overview

Medical Therapy

Treatment is aimed at correcting the underlying cause and allowing you to use your hand and arm as much as possible. In some cases, no treatment is required and recovery happens on its own.

Pharmacotherapy

Over-the-counter or prescription pain medications may be needed to control pain. Anticonvulsants (phenytoin, carbamazepine, gabapentin, and pregabalin), tricyclic antidepressants (amitriptyline and nortriptyline), or other medications (duloxetine) may be used. Lowest dose possible should be used to avoid side effects.

Other Types of Therapy

  • Physical therapy may be recommended for some people to help maintain muscle strength.
  • Orthopedic assistance may increase your ability to use your hand and arm. Such therapy may involve braces, splints, or other appliances.
  • Vocational counseling, occupational therapy, occupational changes, job retraining, or other measures may be recommended.

If other nerves are also affected, an underlying medical problem that can affect nerves should be considered. Medical conditions such as diabetes and kidney disease can damage nerves. In these cases, treatment is also directed at the underlying medical condition.

References



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