Achalasia natural history, complications and prognosis

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1], Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Ahmed Younes M.B.B.CH [2]

Overview

If left untreated, the disease can progress causing complications such as candida esophagitis and esophageal perforation. However, achalasia does not alter the lifespan of the patients. Common complications include GERD, Barrett's esophagus, and aspiration pneumonia. The prognosis is good with cure rate of 60-90% after surgical interventions.

Natural History

Complications

Achalasia may be complicated by

Prognosis

  • With treatment, the outcome for achalasia is usually good.
  • The cure rate ranges from 60 to 90% after surgical interventions.[5]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 ELLIS FG (1960). "The natural history of achalasia of the cardia". Proc. R. Soc. Med. 53: 663–6. PMC 1869428. PMID 13820027.
  2. Sawyers JL, Foster JH (1967). "Surgical considerations in the management of achalasia of the esophagus". Ann. Surg. 165 (5): 780–5. PMC 1617585. PMID 6023934.
  3. Pandolfino JE, Kwiatek MA, Nealis T, Bulsiewicz W, Post J, Kahrilas PJ (2008). "Achalasia: a new clinically relevant classification by high-resolution manometry". Gastroenterology. 135 (5): 1526–33. doi:10.1053/j.gastro.2008.07.022. PMC 2894987. PMID 18722376.
  4. Howard PJ, Maher L, Pryde A, Cameron EW, Heading RC (1992). "Five year prospective study of the incidence, clinical features, and diagnosis of achalasia in Edinburgh". Gut. 33 (8): 1011–5. PMC 1379432. PMID 1398223.
  5. Furuzawa-Carballeda J, Torres-Landa S, Valdovinos MÁ, Coss-Adame E, Martín Del Campo LA, Torres-Villalobos G (2016). "New insights into the pathophysiology of achalasia and implications for future treatment". World J. Gastroenterol. 22 (35): 7892–907. doi:10.3748/wjg.v22.i35.7892. PMC 5028805. PMID 27672286.



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