Difference between revisions of "Ebsteins anomaly of the tricuspid valve historical perspective"

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== Overview ==
 
== Overview ==
Ebstein anomaly was named after [[Wilhelm Ebstein]],<ref>{{WhoNamedIt|synd|435}}</ref><ref>W. Ebstein. Über einen sehr seltenen Fall von Insufficienz der Valvula tricuspidalis, bedingt durch eine angeborene hochgradige Missbildung derselben. Archiv für Anatomie, Physiologie und wissenschaftliche Medicin, Leipzig, 1866, 238-254.</ref> who in 1866 described the heart of the 19 year old Joseph Prescher.
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Ebstein anomaly was named after [[Wilhelm Ebstein]], who in 1866 first described it the heart of a 19 year old patient Joseph Prescher.
  
 
==Historical perspective==
 
==Historical perspective==

Latest revision as of 15:36, 16 January 2020

Ebsteins anomaly of the tricuspid valve Microchapters

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor-In-Chief: Cafer Zorkun, M.D., Ph.D. [2]; Claudia P. Hochberg, M.D.; Priyamvada Singh, MBBS [3]

Overview

Ebstein anomaly was named after Wilhelm Ebstein, who in 1866 first described it the heart of a 19 year old patient Joseph Prescher.

Historical perspective

  • In the year 1866, Dr. Ebstein published his first case report named, "A very rare case of tricuspid regurgitation caused by a congenital defect".[1][2][3]
  • Later in year 1867, Hermann Lebert, a professor of medicine in Breslau, was probably the first to catalogue Ebstein's seminal publication.
  • It is only after 1927 that the term “Ebstein's disease” appeared in the medical literature.
  • Soloff and his colleagues in the yaer 1951 reported the case of ebstein anomaly in a patient using cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography.

References

  1. Mazurak M, Kusa J (June 2017). "The Two Anomalies of Wilhelm Ebstein". Tex Heart Inst J. 44 (3): 198–201. doi:10.14503/THIJ-16-6063. PMC 5505398. PMID 28761400.
  2. van Son JA, Konstantinov IE, Zimmermann V (November 2001). "Wilhelm Ebstein and Ebstein's malformation". Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 20 (5): 1082–5. doi:10.1016/s1010-7940(01)00913-7. PMID 11675224.
  3. Robicsek F (June 2013). "Wilhelm Ebstein and the history of surgery for Ebstein's Disease". Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 61 (4): 286–92. doi:10.1055/s-0032-1304540. PMID 22535676.



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