Vestibular nerve

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Nerve: Vestibular nerve
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Inner ear illustration showing semicircular canal, hair cells, ampulla, cupula, vestibular nerve, & fluid
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Terminal nuclei of the vestibular nerve, with their upper connections. (Schematic.)
1. Cochlear nerve, with its two nuclei.
2. Accessory nucleus.
3. Tuberculum acusticum.
4. Vestibular nerve.
5. Internal nucleus.
6. Nucleus of Deiters.
7. Nucleus of Bechterew.
8. Inferior or descending root of acoustic.
9. Ascending cerebellar fibers.
10. Fibers going to raphé.
11. Fibers taking an oblique course.
12. Lemniscus.
13. Inferior sensory root of trigeminal.
14. Cerebrospinal fasciculus.
15. Raphé.
16. Fourth ventricle.
17. Inferior peduncle. Origin of striæ medullares.
Latin nervus vestibularis
Gray's subject #203 906
From Vestibulocochlear nerve
MeSH Vestibular+Nerve
Dorlands
/ Elsevier
    
n_05/12567055

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]


Overview

The vestibular nerve is one of the two branches of the Vestibulocochlear nerve (the cochlear nerve being the other). It goes to the semicircular canals via the vestibular ganglion. It receives positional information.

Axons of the vestibular nerve synapse in the vestibular nucleus on the lateral floor and wall of the fourth ventricle in the pons and medulla.

It arises from bipolar cells in the vestibular ganglion, ganglion of Scarpa, which is situated in the upper part of the outer end of the internal auditory meatus.

Branches

The peripheral fibers divide into three branches:

See also

Additional images

External links

This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated. Please edit the article if this is the case, and feel free to remove this notice when it is no longer relevant.



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