Trace amine

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Chemical structure of serotonin
Chemical structure of phenethylamine

Trace amines are endogenous compounds structurally related to classical biogenic amines, such as catecholamines, serotonin and histamine. Trace amines include p-tyramine, β-phenylethylamine, tryptamine, octopamine, and 3-iodothyronamine, and are found in the nervous systems of animals from insects to mammals. Also the entheogenic DMT is created in small amounts by the human body during normal metabolism[1] by the enzyme tryptamine-N-methyltransferase.

Trace amines overlap substantially with classical biogenic amines neurotransmitters regarding to chemical properties, synthesis, and breakdown; trace amines commonly colocalize in neurons with these neurotransmitters.

Psychiatric disorders such as depression and schizophrenia have been linked to irregular levels of trace amines.

See also


References

  1. Barker SA, Monti JA and Christian ST (1981). N,N-Dimethyltryptamine: An endogenous hallucinogen. In International Review of Neurobiology, vol 22, pp. 83-110; Academic Press, Inc.


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