Substance or medication induced bipolar disorder diagnostic criteria

Jump to: navigation, search

Bipolar disorder Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Causes

Differentiating Bipolar disorder from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

Diagnostic Criteria

Bipolar I
Bipolar II
Cyclothymic Disorder
Substance/Medication-Induced Bipolar Disorder
Bipolar Disorder Due to Another Medical Condition
Unspecified Bipolar Disorder

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Substance or medication induced bipolar disorder diagnostic criteria On the Web

Most recent articles

cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Substance or medication induced bipolar disorder diagnostic criteria

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Substance or medication induced bipolar disorder diagnostic criteria

CDC on Substance or medication induced bipolar disorder diagnostic criteria

Substance or medication induced bipolar disorder diagnostic criteria in the news

Blogs on Substance or medication induced bipolar disorder diagnostic criteria

Directions to Hospitals Treating Bipolar disorder

Risk calculators and risk factors for Substance or medication induced bipolar disorder diagnostic criteria

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Kiran Singh, M.D. [2]

Diagnostic Criteria

DSM-V Diagnostic Criteria for Substance/Medication-Induced Bipolar and Related Disorder [1]

  • A. A prominent and persistent disturbance in mood that predominates in the clinical picture and is characterized by elevated, expansive, or irritable mood, with or without depressed mood, or markedly diminished interest or pleasure in all, or almost all, activities.

AND

  • B. There is evidence from the history, physical examination, or laboratory findings of both (1)and (2):
  • 1. The symptoms in Criterion A developed during or soon after substance intoxication or withdrawal or after exposure to a medication.
  • 2. The involved substance/medication is capable of producing the symptoms in Criterion A.

AND

  • C. The disturbance is not better explained by a bipolar or related disorder that is not substance/medication-induced. Such evidence of an independent bipolar or related disorder could include the following:
  • The symptoms precede the onset of the substance/medication use; the symptoms persist for a substantial period of time (e.g., about 1 month) after the cessation of acute withdrawal or severe intoxication; or there is other evidence suggesting the existence of an independent non-substance/medication-induced bipolar and related disorder (e.g., a history of recurrent non-substance/medication-related episodes).

AND

  • D. The disturbance does not occur exclusively during the course of a delirium.

AND

  • E. The disturbance causes clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational,or other important areas of functioning.

References

  1. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders : DSM-5. Washington, D.C: American Psychiatric Association. 2013. ISBN 0890425558.


References



Linked-in.jpg