Serratia infection historical perspective

Jump to: navigation, search

Serratia infection Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Serratia infection from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Chest X Ray

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Serratia infection historical perspective On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Serratia infection historical perspective

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Serratia infection historical perspective

CDC on Serratia infection historical perspective

Serratia infection historical perspective in the news

Blogs on Serratia infection historical perspective

Directions to Hospitals Treating Serratia infection

Risk calculators and risk factors for Serratia infection historical perspective

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

Overview

The first description of Serratia is attributed to Pythagoras in 6th centry B.C., where he reported "bloody" food coloration on food products. Serratia micro-organism was first isolated in 1819 in Italy by Bartolemeo Bizio. The characteristic red pigment produced by Serratia marcescens was first extracted by Dr. Kroft in 1902. Woodward and Clark described the first S. marcescens human infection in a patient with bronchiectasis in 1913.

Historical Perspective

  • The first description of Serratia is attributed to Pythagoras in 6th centry B.C., where he reported "bloody" food coloration on food products. The appearance of bloody food has been reported throughout history as ominous, inspirational, or prophesying.[1]
  • Serratia micro-organism was first isolated in 1819 in Italy by Bartolemeo Bizio. The organism was called Serratia in honor of Serafino Serrati, an Italian Physicist, and marcescens (Latin term for "to decay") because of the pigment's rapid decay.[1][2][3]
  • The characteristic red pigment produced by Serratia marcescens was first extracted by Dr. Kroft in 1902. The red pigment was initially referred to as prodigiosin.[4]
  • In 1913, Woodward and Clark described the first S. marcescens human infection in a patient with bronchiectasis.[5]
  • In 1957, the termpseudo-hemoptysis was coined by Robinson and Woolley to describe red sputum that is caused by the Serratia organism, not blood.[6]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Yu VL (1979). "Serratia marcescens: historical perspective and clinical review". N Engl J Med. 300 (16): 887–93. doi:10.1056/NEJM197904193001604. PMID 370597.
  2. Bizio, B (1823). Lettera di Barolomeo al chiarissino canonico Angelo Belloni Sopra il fenomeno della polenta porporina. 30. Italy: Biblioteca Italiana o sia Giornale di Letteratira, Scienze e Arti. pp. 275–295.
  3. Merlino, CP (1924). "Bartolomeo Bizio's letter to the most eminent priest, Angelo Bellani, concerning the phenomenon of the red-colored polenta". J Bacteriol. 9: 527–543. |access-date= requires |url= (help)
  4. Kroft, E (1902). Beitrage zur Biologie des Bacillus prodigiosus und zum Chemischen Verhalten Seines Pigments (Thesis). Germany: University of Wurzberg.
  5. Woodward, HMM; Clarke, KB (1913). "A case of infection in man by the Bacterium prodigiosum". Lancet. 1: 314–315. |access-date= requires |url= (help)
  6. ROBINSON W, WOOLLEY PB (1957). "Pseudohaemoptysis due to Chromobacterium prodigiosum". Lancet. 272 (6973): 819. PMID 13417607.

Linked-in.jpg