Posterior cutaneous nerve of forearm

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Nerve: Posterior cutaneous nerve of forearm
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Diagram of segmental distribution of the cutaneous nerves of the right upper extremity. Posterior view. ("Dors. antibrach. cutan." visible in red at center.)
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Diagram of segmental distribution of the cutaneous nerves of the right upper extremity. Anterior view. ("Dors. antibrach. cutan." visible in red at center.)
Latin n. cutaneus antebrachii posterior, n. cutaneus antibrachii dorsalis
Gray's subject #210 944
From radial nerve
Dorlands
/ Elsevier
    
n_05/12565472

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The dorsal antibrachial cutaneous nerve (external cutaneous branch of musculospiral, posterior antebrachial cutaneous nerve, posterior cutaneous nerve of forearm) is a cutaneous nerve of the forearm.

Course

It perforates the lateral head of the Triceps brachii at its attachment to the humerus.

The upper and smaller branch of the nerve passes to the front of the elbow, lying close to the cephalic vein, and supplies the skin of the lower half of the arm.

The lower branch pierces the deep fascia below the insertion of the Deltoideus, and descends along the lateral side of the arm and elbow, and then along the back of the forearm to the wrist, supplying the skin in its course, and joining, near its termination, with the dorsal branch of the lateral antibrachial cutaneous nerve.

See also

Additional images

External links


This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated. Please edit the article if this is the case, and feel free to remove this notice when it is no longer relevant.



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