Peritonsillar abscess epidemiology and demographics

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Prince Tano Djan, BSc, MBChB [2]

Overview

The incidence of peritonsillar abscess is highest between November to December and April to May in the northern hemisphere. This has been associated with the highest rates of streptococcal pharyngitis and exudative tonsillitis around these times.[1][2] Peritonsillar abscess occurs in all age groups. The highest occurrence is in adults between 20 to 40 years of age.[3][4][5] There is no racial predilection to developing peritonsillar abscess. Males are more commonly affected with peritonsillar abscess than female with male to female ratio of approximately 1.4:1. However, equal male to female ratios have been reported as well.[6][7][8][9][10][11][12]

Epidemiology and demographics

Prevalence and incidence

The incidence of peritonsillar abscess is highest between November to December and April to May in the northern hemisphere. This has been associated with the highest rates of streptococcal pharyngitis and exudative tonsillitis around these times.[1][2]

Age

Peritonsillar abscess occur in all age groups. The highest occurrence is in adults between 20 to 40 years of age.[3][4][5]

Race

There is no racial predilection to developing peritonsillar abscess.

Gender

Males are more commonly affected with peritonsillar abscess than female with male to female ratio of approximately 1.4:1. However, equal male to female ratios have been reported in some studies as well.[6][7][8][9][10][11][12]

Developed and developing countries

Peritonsillar abscess has not been found to vary significantly among countries.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Belleza WG, Kalman S (2006). "Otolaryngologic emergencies in the outpatient setting". Med Clin North Am. 90 (2): 329–53. doi:10.1016/j.mcna.2005.12.001. PMID 16448878.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Bisno AL, Gerber MA, Gwaltney JM, Kaplan EL, Schwartz RH, Infectious Diseases Society of America (2002). "Practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of group A streptococcal pharyngitis. Infectious Diseases Society of America". Clin Infect Dis. 35 (2): 113–25. doi:10.1086/340949. PMID 12087516.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Galioto NJ (2008). "Peritonsillar abscess". Am Fam Physician. 77 (2): 199–202. PMID 18246890.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Steyer TE (2002). "Peritonsillar abscess: diagnosis and treatment". Am Fam Physician. 65 (1): 93–6. PMID 11804446.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Khayr W, Taepke J (2005). "Management of peritonsillar abscess: needle aspiration versus incision and drainage versus tonsillectomy". Am J Ther. 12 (4): 344–50. PMID 16041198.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Ong YK, Goh YH, Lee YL (2004). "Peritonsillar infections: local experience". Singapore Med J. 45 (3): 105–9. PMID 15029410.
  7. 7.0 7.1 Marom T, Cinamon U, Itskoviz D, Roth Y (2010). "Changing trends of peritonsillar abscess". Am J Otolaryngol. 31 (3): 162–7. doi:10.1016/j.amjoto.2008.12.003. PMID 20015734.
  8. 8.0 8.1 Klug TE (2014). "Incidence and microbiology of peritonsillar abscess: the influence of season, age, and gender". Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 33 (7): 1163–7. doi:10.1007/s10096-014-2052-8. PMID 24474247.
  9. 9.0 9.1 Gavriel H, Lazarovitch T, Pomortsev A, Eviatar E (2009). "Variations in the microbiology of peritonsillar abscess". Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 28 (1): 27–31. doi:10.1007/s10096-008-0583-6. PMID 18612664.
  10. 10.0 10.1 Sunnergren O, Swanberg J, Mölstad S (2008). "Incidence, microbiology and clinical history of peritonsillar abscesses". Scand J Infect Dis. 40 (9): 752–5. doi:10.1080/00365540802040562. PMID 19086341.
  11. 11.0 11.1 Hidaka H, Kuriyama S, Yano H, Tsuji I, Kobayashi T (2011). "Precipitating factors in the pathogenesis of peritonsillar abscess and bacteriological significance of the Streptococcus milleri group". Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 30 (4): 527–32. doi:10.1007/s10096-010-1114-9. PMID 21086007.
  12. 12.0 12.1 Costales-Marcos M, López-Álvarez F, Núñez-Batalla F, Moreno-Galindo C, Alvarez Marcos C, Llorente-Pendás JL (2012). "[Peritonsillar infections: prospective study of 100 consecutive cases]". Acta Otorrinolaringol Esp. 63 (3): 212–7. doi:10.1016/j.otorri.2012.01.001. PMID 22425204.

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