Oral cancer MRI

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Sargun Singh Walia M.B.B.S.[2], Simrat Sarai, M.D. [3]; Grammar Reviewer: Natalie Harpenau, B.S.[4]

Overview

Neck MRIs may be helpful in the diagnosis of oral cancer. An MRI can provide detailed view of cancer spread. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers an advantage over computed tomographic scans (CT scan) in the detection and localization of head and neck tumors and in the distinction of lymph nodes from blood vessels.

MRI findings

  • An MRI scan may be used to examine oral cancer.
  • MRIs provide a very detailed view and can be useful in determining whether or not the cancer has spread, either to other areas in the neck or other regions of the body.
  • Information from diagnostic imaging studies may be used in staging.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging offers an advantage over computed tomographic scans in the detection and localization of head and neck tumors and in the distinction of lymph nodes from blood vessels.
SCC of the tongue Source: radiopedia.org[1]

References

  1. Case courtesy of Dr Sandeep Bhuta , <a href="https://radiopaedia.org/">Radiopaedia.org</a>. From the case <a href="https://radiopaedia.org/cases/27409">rID: 27409</a>

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