Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia laboratory findings

Jump to: navigation, search

Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

Diagnostic Study of Choice

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Electrocardiogram

X-ray

Echocardiography and Ultrasound

CT scan

MRI

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia laboratory findings On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia laboratory findings

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia laboratory findings

CDC on Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia laboratory findings

Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia laboratory findings in the news

Blogs on Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia laboratory findings

Directions to Hospitals Treating Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia

Risk calculators and risk factors for Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia laboratory findings

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Monalisa Dmello, M.B,B.S., M.D. [2]

Overview

Elevated serum human chorionic gonadotropin is diagnostic of choriocarcinoma.[1][2]

Laboratory Findings

Quantitative serum HCG

  • Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG or b-HCG) is the most common tumor marker test used to diagnose GTD[1]
  • HCG is markedly elevated (usu. >10,000 IU)[2]
  • HCG is a very sensitive test for diagnosing most gestational trophoblastic tumors
  • HCG is usually measured in the blood, but it can also be measured in the urine
  • HCG levels are much higher in women with complete hydatidiform moles and gestational choriocarcinoma compared to HCG levels in women with a normal pregnancy
  • With partial moles, the HCG level is higher than normal, but it is not as high as with other types of GTD
  • With placental site tumors, the HCG level may be slightly higher than normal, but it is not considered a good marker for this type of tumor
  • An HCG test can help find GTD after pregnancy or miscarriage as this hormone should not be present in the blood or urine soon afterward

Human placental lactogen (hPL)

  • Human placental lactogen (hPL) is a tumor marker that may be used to follow women with placental site trophoblastic tumors
  • Elevated hPL levels are found in women with some types of GTD

Complete blood count

Kidney function tests

Liver function tests

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Diagnosing gestational trophoblastic disease. Canadian Cancer Society. http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/gestational-trophoblastic-disease/diagnosis/?region=ns Accessed on October 13, 2015
  2. 2.0 2.1 Choriocarcinoma. librepathology.org. http://librepathology.org/wiki/index.php/Choriocarcinoma Accessed on October 8, 2015

Linked-in.jpg