FAM29A

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Family with sequence similarity 29, member A
Identifiers
Symbols FAM29A ; MGC102696; MGC138798; MGC138799; RP11-296P7.3
External IDs Template:MGI HomoloGene9760
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE FAM29A 218602 s at tn.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
Template:GNF Ortholog box
Species Human Mouse
Entrez n/a n/a
Ensembl n/a n/a
UniProt n/a n/a
RefSeq (mRNA) n/a n/a
RefSeq (protein) n/a n/a
Location (UCSC) n/a n/a
PubMed search n/a n/a

Family with sequence similarity 29, member A, also known as FAM29A, is a human gene.[1]


References

  1. "Entrez Gene: FAM29A family with sequence similarity 29, member A".

Further reading

  • Maruyama K, Sugano S (1994). "Oligo-capping: a simple method to replace the cap structure of eukaryotic mRNAs with oligoribonucleotides". Gene. 138 (1–2): 171–4. PMID 8125298.
  • Suzuki Y, Yoshitomo-Nakagawa K, Maruyama K; et al. (1997). "Construction and characterization of a full length-enriched and a 5'-end-enriched cDNA library". Gene. 200 (1–2): 149–56. PMID 9373149.
  • Nagase T, Kikuno R, Nakayama M; et al. (2001). "Prediction of the coding sequences of unidentified human genes. XVIII. The complete sequences of 100 new cDNA clones from brain which code for large proteins in vitro". DNA Res. 7 (4): 273–81. PMID 10997877.
  • Hartley JL, Temple GF, Brasch MA (2001). "DNA cloning using in vitro site-specific recombination". Genome Res. 10 (11): 1788–95. PMID 11076863.
  • Wiemann S, Weil B, Wellenreuther R; et al. (2001). "Toward a catalog of human genes and proteins: sequencing and analysis of 500 novel complete protein coding human cDNAs". Genome Res. 11 (3): 422–35. doi:10.1101/gr.154701. PMID 11230166.
  • Strausberg RL, Feingold EA, Grouse LH; et al. (2003). "Generation and initial analysis of more than 15,000 full-length human and mouse cDNA sequences". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99 (26): 16899–903. doi:10.1073/pnas.242603899. PMID 12477932.
  • Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T; et al. (2004). "Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs". Nat. Genet. 36 (1): 40–5. doi:10.1038/ng1285. PMID 14702039.
  • Humphray SJ, Oliver K, Hunt AR; et al. (2004). "DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 9". Nature. 429 (6990): 369–74. doi:10.1038/nature02465. PMID 15164053.
  • Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA; et al. (2004). "The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC)". Genome Res. 14 (10B): 2121–7. doi:10.1101/gr.2596504. PMID 15489334.
  • Wiemann S, Arlt D, Huber W; et al. (2004). "From ORFeome to biology: a functional genomics pipeline". Genome Res. 14 (10B): 2136–44. doi:10.1101/gr.2576704. PMID 15489336.
  • Mehrle A, Rosenfelder H, Schupp I; et al. (2006). "The LIFEdb database in 2006". Nucleic Acids Res. 34 (Database issue): D415–8. doi:10.1093/nar/gkj139. PMID 16381901.
  • Nousiainen M, Silljé HH, Sauer G; et al. (2006). "Phosphoproteome analysis of the human mitotic spindle". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103 (14): 5391–6. doi:10.1073/pnas.0507066103. PMID 16565220.
  • Beausoleil SA, Villén J, Gerber SA; et al. (2006). "A probability-based approach for high-throughput protein phosphorylation analysis and site localization". Nat. Biotechnol. 24 (10): 1285–92. doi:10.1038/nbt1240. PMID 16964243.

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