Crocin

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File:Crocin.png
Chemical structure of crocin.

Crocin is a natural carotenoid chemical compound that is found in the flowers crocus and gardenia. It is the diester formed from the disaccharide gentiobiose and the dicarboxylic acid crocetin. It has a deep red color and forms crystals with a melting point of 186 °C. When dissolved in water, it forms an orange solution.

Crocin is the chemical ingredient primarily responsible for the color of saffron. It has also been shown to be a potent antioxidant. [1] [2] [3]

References

  1. Papandreou MA, Kanakis CD, Polissiou MG, Efthimiopoulos S, Cordopatis P, Margarity M, Lamari FN. (2006). "Inhibitory activity on amyloid-beta aggregation and antioxidant properties of Crocus sativus stigmas extract and its crocin constituents". J Agric Food Chem. 54 (23): 8762&ndash, 8. PMID 17090119.
  2. Ochiai T; et al. (2006). "Protective effects of carotenoids from saffron on neuronal injury in vitro and in vivo". Biochim Biophys Acta. ? (?): ?. PMID 17215084.
  3. Zheng YQ, Liu JX, Wang JN, Xu L. (2006). "Effects of crocin on reperfusion-induced oxidative/nitrative injury to cerebral microvessels after global cerebral ischemia". Brain Res. ? (?): ?. PMID 17274961.

See also


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