Cerebellar vermis

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Brain: Cerebellar vermis
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Schematic representation of the major anatomical subdivisions of the cerebellum. Superior view of an "unrolled" cerebellum, placing the vermis in one plane.
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Under surface of the cerebellum. ("Tuber vermis" labeled at bottom.)
Latin vermis cerebelli
Gray's subject #187 788
Part of Cerebellum
NeuroNames ancil-146
Dorlands/Elsevier v_06/12854118


Overview

Part of the structure of animal brains, the cerebellar vermis is a narrow, wormlike structure between the hemispheres of the cerebellum. It is the site of termination of the spinocerebellar pathways that carry subconscious proprioception.

Recent research on the posterior cerebellar vermis indicates that this particular area of the brain may be linked to the brain's natural ability to integrate and analyze inertial motion. Specialized cells in this area, known as Purkinje cells, are now thought to receive sensory information from the vestibular system of the inner ears and use this to compute information about the body's movement through space.[1]

References

External links

lt:Kirminas



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