Arthrogryposis overview

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

Overview

Arthrogryposis is a rare congenital disorder that causes multiple joint contractures and is characterized by muscle weakness and fibrosis.

The disease derives its name from Greek literally meaning 'curved or hooked joints'. There are many known subgroups of AMC, with differing signs, symptoms, causes etc. In some cases, few joints may be affected and the range of motion may be nearly normal. In the most common type of arthrogryposis, hands, wrists, elbows, shoulders, hips, feet and knees are affected. In the most severe types, nearly every joint is involved, including the jaw and back.

It is a non-progressive disease.

Frequently, the contractures are accompanied by muscle weakness, which further limits movement.

AMC is typically symmetrical and involves all four extremities with some variation seen.

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