Amoxapine

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Amoxapine
Black Box Warning
Adult Indications & Dosage
Pediatric Indications & Dosage
Contraindications
Warnings & Precautions
Adverse Reactions
Drug Interactions
Use in Specific Populations
Administration & Monitoring
Overdosage
Pharmacology
Clinical Studies
How Supplied
Images
Patient Counseling Information
Precautions with Alcohol
Brand Names
Look-Alike Names

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Pratik Bahekar, MBBS [2]

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Black Box Warning

Suicidality and Antidepressant Drugs
See full prescribing information for complete Boxed Warning.
Antidepressants increased the risk compared to placebo of suicidal thinking and behavior (suicidality) in children, adolescents, and young adults in short-term studies of major depressive disorder (MDD) and other psychiatric disorders. Anyone considering the use of amoxapine or any other antidepressant in a child, adolescent, or young adult must balance this risk with the clinical need. Short-term studies did not show an increase in the risk of suicidality with antidepressants compared to placebo in adults beyond age 24; there was a reduction in risk with antidepressants compared to placebo in adults aged 65 and older. Depression and certain other psychiatric disorders are themselves associated with increases in the risk of suicide. Patients of all ages who are started on antidepressant therapy should be monitored appropriately and observed closely for clinical worsening, suicidality, or unusual changes in behavior. Families and caregivers should be advised of the need for close observation and communication with the prescriber. Amoxapine is not approved for use in pediatric patients.

Overview

Amoxapine is a Tricyclic antidepressant that is FDA approved for the {{{indicationType}}} of * depression, endogenous depression, severe major depression with psychotic features.. There is a Black Box Warning for this drug as shown here. Common adverse reactions include constipation, xerostomia, somnolence, blurred vision, fatigue..

Adult Indications and Dosage

FDA-Labeled Indications and Dosage (Adult)

Depression

  • Indicated for the relief of symptoms of depression in patients with neurotic or reactive depressive disorders as well as endogenous and psychotic depressions; indicated for depression accompanied by anxiety or agitation.
Initial, 50 mg PO 2-3 times a day; may increase dosage up to 100 mg 2-3 times a day by end of the first week OR may start with 300 mg/day, but notable sedation may occur during the first few days of therapy.
  • Maintenance, usual effective dose is 120-300 mg/day PO; may increase dosage to 400 mg/day after 3 weeks if there is inadequate response and hospitalized patients with no history of convulsive seizures may have the dose raised cautiously up to 600 mg/day in divided doses.

Endogenous depression

  • Initial, 50 mg PO 2-3 times a day; may increase dosage up to 100 mg 2-3 times a day by end of the first week OR may start with 300 mg/day, but notable sedation may occur during the first few days of therapy.
  • Maintenance, usual effective dose is 120-300 mg/day PO; may increase dosage to 400 mg/day after 3 weeks if there is inadequate response and hospitalized patients with no history of convulsive seizures may have the dose raised cautiously up to 600 mg/day in divided doses.

Severe major depression with psychotic features

  • Initial, 50 mg PO 2-3 times a day; may increase dosage up to 100 mg 2-3 times a day by end of the first week OR may start with 300 mg/day, but notable sedation may occur during the first few days of therapy.
  • Maintenance, usual effective dose is 120-300 mg/day PO; may increase dosage to 400 mg/day after 3 weeks if there is inadequate response and hospitalized patients with no history of convulsive seizures may have the dose raised cautiously up to 600 mg/day in divided doses.

Off-Label Use and Dosage (Adult)

Guideline-Supported Use

There is limited information about Off-Label Guideline-Supported Use of Amoxapine in adult patients.

Non–Guideline-Supported Use

There is limited information about Off-Label Non–Guideline-Supported Use of Amoxapine in adult patients.

Pediatric Indications and Dosage

FDA-Labeled Indications and Dosage (Pediatric)

Depression

  • Safety and efficacy have not been established in patients younger than 16 years of age.

Endogenous depression

  • Safety and efficacy have not been established in patients younger than 16 years of age.

Severe major depression with psychotic features

  • Safety and efficacy have not been established in patients younger than 16 years of age.

Off-Label Use and Dosage (Pediatric)

Guideline-Supported Use

There is limited information about Off-Label Guideline-Supported Use of Amoxapine in pediatric patients.

Non–Guideline-Supported Use

  • There is limited information about Off-Label Non–Guideline-Supported Use of Amoxapine in pediatric patients.

Contraindications

  • Prior hypersensitivity to dibenzoxazepine compounds.
  • It should not be given concomitantly with monoamine oxidase inhibitors.
  • Hyperpyretic crises, severe convulsions, and deaths have occurred in patients receiving tricyclic antidepressants and monoamine oxidase inhibitors.
  • When it is desired to replace a monoamine oxidase inhibitor with amoxapine, a minimum of 14 days should be allowed to elapse after the former is discontinued.
  • Initiated cautiously with gradual increase in dosage.
  • Not recommended during the acute recovery phase following myocardial infarction.

Warnings

Suicidality and Antidepressant Drugs
See full prescribing information for complete Boxed Warning.
Antidepressants increased the risk compared to placebo of suicidal thinking and behavior (suicidality) in children, adolescents, and young adults in short-term studies of major depressive disorder (MDD) and other psychiatric disorders. Anyone considering the use of amoxapine or any other antidepressant in a child, adolescent, or young adult must balance this risk with the clinical need. Short-term studies did not show an increase in the risk of suicidality with antidepressants compared to placebo in adults beyond age 24; there was a reduction in risk with antidepressants compared to placebo in adults aged 65 and older. Depression and certain other psychiatric disorders are themselves associated with increases in the risk of suicide. Patients of all ages who are started on antidepressant therapy should be monitored appropriately and observed closely for clinical worsening, suicidality, or unusual changes in behavior. Families and caregivers should be advised of the need for close observation and communication with the prescriber. Amoxapine is not approved for use in pediatric patients.

Clinical Worsening and Suicide Risk

Patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), both adult and pediatric, may experience worsening of their depression and/or the emergence of suicidal ideation and behavior (suicidality) or unusual changes in behavior, whether or not they are taking antidepressant medications, and this risk may persist until significant remission occurs. Suicide is a known risk of depression and certain other psychiatric disorders, and these disorders themselves are the strongest predictors of suicide. There has been a long-standing concern, however, that antidepressants may have a role in inducing worsening of depression and the emergence of suicidality in certain patients during the early phases of treatment. Pooled analyses of short-term placebo-controlled trials of antidepressant drugs (SSRIs and others) showed that these drugs increase the risk of suicidal thinking and behavior (suicidality) in children, adolescents, and young adults (ages 18-24) with major depressive disorder (MDD) and other psychiatric disorders. Short-term studies did not show an increase in the risk of suicidality with antidepressants compared to placebo in adults beyond age 24; there was a reduction with antidepressants compared to placebo in adults aged 65 and older. The pooled analyses of placebo-controlled trials in children and adolescents with MDD, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), or other psychiatric disorders included a total of 24 short-term trials of 9 antidepressant drugs in over 4400 patients. The pooled analyses of placebo-controlled trials in adults with MDD or other psychiatric disorders included a total of 295 short-term trials (median duration of 2 months) of 11 antidepressant drugs in over 77,000 patients. There was considerable variation in risk of suicidality among drugs, but a tendency toward an increase in the younger patients for almost all drugs studied. There were differences in absolute risk of suicidality across the different indications, with the highest incidence in MDD. The risk differences (drug vs placebo), however, were relatively stable within age strata and across indications. These risk differences (drug-placebo difference in the number of cases of suicidality per 1000 patients treated) are provided in Table 1. No suicides occurred in any of the pediatric trials. There were suicides in the adult trials, but the number was not sufficient to reach any conclusion about drug effect on suicide. It is unknown whether the suicidality risk extends to longer-term use, i.e., beyond several months. However, there is substantial evidence from placebo-controlled maintenance trials in adults with depression that the use of antidepressants can delay the recurrence of depression. All patients being treated with antidepressants for any indication should be monitored appropriately and observed closely for clinical worsening, suicidality, and unusual changes in behavior, especially during the initial few months of a course of drug therapy, or at times of dose changes, either increases or decreases. The following symptoms, anxiety, agitation, panic attacks, insomnia, irritability, hostility, aggressiveness, impulsivity, akathisia (psychomotor restlessness), hypomania, and mania, have been reported in adult and pediatric patients being treated with antidepressants for major depressive disorder as well as for other indications, both psychiatric and nonpsychiatric. Although a causal link between the emergence of such symptoms and either the worsening of depression and/or the emergence of suicidal impulses has not been established, there is concern that such symptoms may represent precursors to emerging suicidality. Consideration should be given to changing the therapeutic regimen, including possibly discontinuing the medication, in patients whose depression is persistently worse, or who are experiencing emergent suicidality or symptoms that might be precursors to worsening depression or suicidality, especially if these symptoms are severe, abrupt in onset, or were not part of the patient's presenting symptoms. Families and caregivers of patients being treated with antidepressants for major depressive disorder or other indications, both psychiatric and nonpsychiatric, should be alerted about the need to monitor patients for the emergence of agitation, irritability, unusual changes in behavior, and the other symptoms described above, as well as the emergence of suicidality, and to report such symptoms immediately to health care providers. Such monitoring should include daily observation by families and caregivers. Prescriptions for amoxapine should be written for the smallest quantity of tablets consistent with good patient management, in order to reduce the risk of overdose.

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Screening Patients for Bipolar Disorder

A major depressive episode may be the initial presentation of bipolar disorder. It is generally believed (though not established in controlled trials) that treating such an episode with an antidepressant alone may increase the likelihood of precipitation of a mixed/manic episode in patients at risk for bipolar disorder. Whether any of the symptoms described above represent such a conversion is unknown. However, prior to initiating treatment with an antidepressant, patients with depressive symptoms should be adequately screened to determine if they are at risk for bipolar disorder; such screening should include a detailed psychiatric history, including a family history of suicide, bipolar disorder, and depression. It should be noted that amoxapine is not approved for use in treating bipolar depression.

Tardive Dyskinesia

Tardive dyskinesia, a syndrome consisting of potentially irreversible, involuntary, dyskinetic movements may develop in patients treated with neuroleptic (i.e., antipsychotic) drugs. (Amoxapine is not an antipsychotic, but it has substantive neuroleptic activity.) Although the prevalence of the syndrome appears to be highest among the elderly, especially elderly women, it is impossible to rely upon prevalence estimates to predict, at the inception of neuroleptic treatment, which patients are likely to develop the syndrome. Whether neuroleptic drug products differ in their potential to cause tardive dyskinesia is unknown. Both the risk of developing the syndrome and the likelihood that it will become irreversible are believed to increase as the duration of treatment and the total cumulative dose of neuroleptic drugs administered to the patient increase. However, the syndrome can develop, although much less commonly, after relatively brief treatment periods at low doses. There is no known treatment for established cases of tardive dyskinesia, although the syndrome may remit, partially or completely, if neuroleptic treatment is withdrawn. Neuroleptic treatment itself, however, may suppress (or partially suppress) the signs and symptoms of the syndrome and thereby may possibly mask the underlying disease process. The effect that symptomatic suppression has upon the long-term course of the syndrome is unknown. Given these considerations, neuroleptics should be prescribed in a manner that is most likely to minimize the occurrence of tardive dyskinesia. Chronic neuroleptic treatment should generally be reserved for patients who suffer from a chronic illness that, 1) is known to respond to neuroleptic drugs, and, 2) for whom alternative, equally effective, but potentially less harmful treatments are not available or appropriate. In patients who do require chronic treatment, the smallest dose and the shortest duration of treatment producing a satisfactory clinical response should be sought. The need for continued treatment should be reassessed periodically. If signs and symptoms of tardive dyskinesia appear in a patient on neuroleptics, drug discontinuation should be considered. However, some patients may require treatment despite the presence of the syndrome.

Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS)

A potentially fatal symptom complex sometimes referred to as Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS) has been reported in association with antipsychotic drugs and with amoxapine. Clinical manifestations of NMS are hyperpyrexia, muscle rigidity, altered mental status and evidence of autonomic instability (irregular pulse or blood pressure, tachycardia, diaphoresis, and cardiac dysrhythmias). The diagnostic evaluation of patients with this syndrome is complicated. In arriving at a diagnosis, it is important to identify cases where the clinical presentation includes both serious medical illness (e.g., pneumonia, systemic infection, etc.) and untreated or inadequately treated extrapyramidal signs and symptoms (EPS). Other important considerations in the differential diagnosis include central anticholinergic toxicity, heat stroke, drug fever and primary central nervous system (CNS) pathology. The management of NMS should include

  • Immediate discontinuation of antipsychotic drugs and other drugs not essential to concurrent therapy,
  • Intensive symptomatic treatment and medical monitoring, and 3) treatment of any concomitant serious medical problems for which specific treatments are available. There is no general agreement about specific pharmacological treatment regimens for uncomplicated NMS.

If a patient requires antipsychotic drug treatment after recovery from NMS, the potential reintroduction of drug therapy should be carefully considered. The patient should be carefully monitored since recurrences of NMS have been reported. Amoxapine should be used with caution in patients with a history of urinary retention, angle-closure glaucoma, or increased intraocular pressure. Patients with cardiovascular disorders should be watched closely. Tricyclic antidepressant drugs, particularly when given in high doses, can induce sinus tachycardia, changes in conduction time, and arrhythmias. Myocardial infarction and stroke have been reported with drugs of this class. Extreme caution should be used in treating patients with a history of convulsive disorder or those with overt or latent seizure disorders.

Adverse Reactions

Clinical Trials Experience

Central nervous system

Anxiety, insomnia, restlessness, nervousness, palpitations, tremors, confusion, excitement, nightmares, ataxia, alterations in EEG patterns.

Cardiovascular

Hypotension, hypertension, syncope, tachycardia.

Hematologic

Leukopenia, agranulocytosis.

Gastrointestinal

Epigastric distress, vomiting, flatulence, abdominal pain, peculiar taste, diarrhea.

Hypersensitive Reactions

Drug fever, urticaria, photosensitization, pruritus, vasculitis, hepatitis, skin rash.

Anticholinergic

Disturbances of accommodation, mydriasis, delayed micturition, urinary retention, nasal stuffiness.

Endocrine

Elevation of prolactin levels.

Miscellaneous

Lacrimation, weight gain or loss, altered liver function, painful ejaculation, pancreatitis, hepatitis, jaundice, urinary frequency, testicular swelling, anorexia, alopecia.

Postmarketing Experience

There is limited information regarding Amoxapine Postmarketing Experience in the drug label.

Drug Interactions

  • Drugs Metabolized by P450 2D6
  • The biochemical activity of the drug metabolizing isozyme cytochrome P450 2D6 (debrisoquin hydroxylase) is reduced in a subset of the caucasian population (about 7 to 10% of caucasians are so called “poor metabolizers”); reliable estimates of the prevalence of reduced P450 2D6 isozyme activity among Asian, African and other populations are not yet available. Poor metabolizers have higher than expected plasma concentrations of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) when given usual doses. Depending on the fraction of drug metabolized by P450 2D6, the increase in plasma concentration may be small, or quite large (8 fold increase in plasma AUC of the TCA).
  • In addition, certain drugs inhibit the activity of this isozyme and make normal metabolizers resemble poor metabolizers. An individual who is stable on a given dose of TCA may become abruptly toxic when given one of these inhibiting drugs as concomitant therapy. The drugs that inhibit cytochrome P450 2D6 include some that are not metabolized by the enzyme (quinidine, cimetidine) and many that are substrates for P450 2D6 (many other antidepressants, phenothiazines, and the Type 1C antiarrhythmics propafenone and flecainide). While all the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), e.g., fluoxetine, sertraline, and paroxetine, inhibit P450 2D6, they may vary in the extent of inhibition. The extent to which SSRI-TCA interactions may pose clinical problems will depend on the degree of inhibition and the pharmacokinetics of the SSRI involved. Nevertheless, caution is indicated in the co-administration of TCAs with any of the SSRIs and also in switching from one class to the other. Of particular importance, sufficient time must elapse before initiating TCA treatment in a patient being withdrawn from fluoxetine, given the long half-life of the parent and active metabolite (at least 5 weeks may be necessary).
  • Concomitant use of tricyclic antidepressants with drugs that can inhibit cytochrome P450 2D6 may require lower doses than usually prescribed for either the tricyclic antidepressant or the other drug. Furthermore, whenever one of these other drugs is withdrawn from co-therapy, an increased dose of tricyclic antidepressant may be required. It is desirable to monitor TCA plasma levels whenever a TCA is going to be co-administered with another drug known to be an inhibitor of P450 2D6.

Use in Specific Populations

Pregnancy

Pregnancy Category (FDA): C Studies performed in mice, rats, and rabbiats have demonstrated no evidence of teratogenic effect due to amoxapine. Embryotoxicity was seen in rats and rabbits given oral doses approximating the human dose. Fetotoxic effects (intrauterine death, stillbirth, decreased birth weight) were seen in animals studied at oral doses 3-10 times the human dose. Decreased postnatal survival (between days 0-4) was demonstrated in the offspring of rats at 5-10 times the human dose. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Amoxapine should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.
Pregnancy Category (AUS): There is no Australian Drug Evaluation Committee (ADEC) guidance on usage of Amoxapine in women who are pregnant.

Labor and Delivery

There is no FDA guidance on use of Amoxapine during labor and delivery.

Nursing Mothers

Amoxapine, like many other systemic drugs, is excreted in human milk. Because effects of the drug on infants are unknown, caution should be exercised when amoxapine is administered to nursing women.

Pediatric Use

Anyone considering the use of amoxapine in a child or adolescent must balance the potential risks with the clinical need.

Geriatic Use

Clinical studies of amoxapine were not adequate to determine whether subjects aged 65 and over respond differently from younger subjects. Amoxapine is known to be substantially excreted by the kidney.Clinical circumstances, some of which may be more common in the elderly, such as hepatic or renal impairment, should be considered. Greater sensitivity (e.g., tardive dyskinesia, sedation) of some older individuals cannot be ruled out. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, usually starting at a lower dose .

Gender

There is no FDA guidance on the use of Amoxapine with respect to specific gender populations.

Race

There is no FDA guidance on the use of Amoxapine with respect to specific racial populations.

Renal Impairment

There is no FDA guidance on the use of Amoxapine in patients with renal impairment.

Hepatic Impairment

There is no FDA guidance on the use of Amoxapine in patients with hepatic impairment.

Females of Reproductive Potential and Males

There is no FDA guidance on the use of Amoxapine in women of reproductive potentials and males.

Immunocompromised Patients

There is no FDA guidance one the use of Amoxapine in patients who are immunocompromised.

Administration and Monitoring

Administration

There is limited information regarding Amoxapine Administration in the drug label.

Monitoring

There is limited information regarding Amoxapine Monitoring in the drug label.

IV Compatibility

There is limited information regarding the compatibility of Amoxapine and IV administrations.

Overdosage

There is limited information regarding Amoxapine overdosage. If you suspect drug poisoning or overdose, please contact the National Poison Help hotline (1-800-222-1222) immediately.

Pharmacology

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Amoxapine
Systematic (IUPAC) name
2-chloro-11-(piperazin-1-yl)dibenzo[b,f][1,4]oxazepine
Identifiers
CAS number 14028-44-5
ATC code N06AA17
PubChem 2170
DrugBank DB00543
Chemical data
Formula C17H16ClN3O 
Mol. mass 313.781 g/mol
SMILES eMolecules & PubChem
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability >60%[1]
Protein binding 90%[2]
Metabolism Hepatic (cytochrome P450 system)[1]
Half life 8–10 hours (30 hours for chief active metabolite)[2]
Excretion Renal (60%), faeces (18%)[1]
Therapeutic considerations
Licence data

US

Pregnancy cat.

C(US)

Legal status

Prescription Only (S4)(AU) -only(US)

Routes Oral

Mechanism of Action

Amoxapine is an antidepressant with mild sedative property and an unknown mechanism of action. It reduces norepinephrine and serotonin uptake and inhibits the response of dopamine receptors to dopamine. It is not an inhibitor of monoamine oxidase

Structure

Amoxapine is an antidepressant of the dibenzoxazepine class, chemically distinct from the dibenzazepines, dibenzocycloheptenes, and dibenzoxepines. It is designated chemically as 2-Chloro-11-(1-piperazinyl)dibenz[b,f][1,4]oxazepine. The structural formula is represented below

Amoxapine11.PNG

Pharmacodynamics

Amoxapine is an antidepressant with a mild sedative component to its action. The mechanism of its clinical action in man is not well understood. In animals, amoxapine reduced the uptake of norepinephrine and serotonin and blocked the response of dopamine receptors to dopamine. Amoxapine is not a monoamine oxidase inhibitor. Amoxapine is absorbed rapidly and reaches peak blood levels approximately 90 minutes after ingestion. It is almost completely metabolized. The main route of excretion is the kidney. In vitro tests show that amoxapine binding to human serum is approximately 90%. In man, amoxapine serum concentration declines with a half-life of eight hours. However, the major metabolite, 8-hydroxyamoxapine, has a biologic half-life of 30 hours. Metabolites are excreted in the urine in conjugated form as glucuronides. Clinical studies have demonstrated that amoxapine has a more rapid onset of action than either amitriptyline or imipramine. The initial clinical effect may occur within four to seven days and occurs within two weeks in over 80% of responders.

Pharmacokinetics

There is limited information regarding Amoxapine Pharmacokinetics in the drug label.

Nonclinical Toxicology

There is limited information regarding Amoxapine Nonclinical Toxicology in the drug label.

Clinical Studies

There is limited information regarding Amoxapine Clinical Studies in the drug label.

How Supplied

There is limited information regarding Amoxapine How Supplied in the drug label.

Storage

There is limited information regarding Amoxapine Storage in the drug label.

Images

Drug Images

Amoxapine NDC 05915713.jpg

Drug Name: Amoxapine
Ingredient(s): AMOXAPINE[AMOXAPINE]
Imprint: DAN;25;5713
Dosage: 25 mg
Color(s): White
Shape: Round
Size (mm): 6
Score: 2
NDC:05915713

Drug Label Author: Watson Laboratories, Inc.

This pill image is provided by the National Library of Medicine's PillBox.
Amoxapine NDC 05915714.jpg

Drug Name: Amoxapine
Ingredient(s): AMOXAPINE[AMOXAPINE]
Imprint: DAN;50;5714
Dosage: 50 mg
Color(s): Orange
Shape: Round
Size (mm): 8
Score: 2
NDC:05915714

Drug Label Author: Watson Laboratories, Inc.

This pill image is provided by the National Library of Medicine's PillBox.
Amoxapine NDC 05915715.jpg

Drug Name: Amoxapine
Ingredient(s): AMOXAPINE[AMOXAPINE]
Imprint: DAN;100;5715
Dosage: 100 mg
Color(s): Blue
Shape: Round
Size (mm): 9
Score: 2
NDC:05915715

Drug Label Author: Watson Laboratories, Inc.

This pill image is provided by the National Library of Medicine's PillBox.

Package and Label Display Panel

Amoxapine55.PNG
This image of the FDA label is provided by the National Library of Medicine.
Amoxapine22.PNG
This image of the FDA label is provided by the National Library of Medicine.
Amoxapine33.PNG
This image of the FDA label is provided by the National Library of Medicine.
Amoxapine44.PNG
This image of the FDA label is provided by the National Library of Medicine.
Amoxapine99.jpeg
This image of the FDA label is provided by the National Library of Medicine.

Patient Counseling Information

There is limited information regarding Amoxapine Patient Counseling Information in the drug label.

Precautions with Alcohol

Alcohol-Amoxapine interaction has not been established. Talk to your doctor about the effects of taking alcohol with this medication.

Brand Names

There is limited information regarding Amoxapine Brand Names in the drug label.

Look-Alike Drug Names

There is limited information regarding Amoxapine Look-Alike Drug Names in the drug label.

Drug Shortage Status

Price

References

The contents of this FDA label are provided by the National Library of Medicine.

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 "Asendin, (amoxapine) dosing, indications, interactions, adverse effects, and more". Medscape Reference. WebMD. Retrieved 26 November 2013.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Kinney, JL; Evans, RL (September–October 1982). "Evaluation of amoxapine". Clinical Pharmacy. 1 (5): 417–24. PMID 6764165.











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