Valence (psychology)

Jump to: navigation, search


Overview

'Valence', as used in psychology, especially in discussing emotions, means the intrinsic attractiveness (positive valence) or aversiveness (negative valence) of an event, object, or situation.[1] However, the term is also used to characterize and categorize specific emotions. For example, the emotions popularly referred to as "negative", such as anger and fear, have "negative valence". Joy has "positive valence". Positively valenced emotions are evoked by positively valenced events, objects, or situations. The term is also used about the hedonic tone of feelings, affect, certain behaviors (for example, approach and avoidance), goal-attainment or -non-attainment, and conformity with or violation of norms. Ambivalence can be viewed as conflict between positive and negative valence-carriers.Template:Fix/category[citation needed]

History of Usage

The term entered English usage in psychology with the translation from German in 1935 of works of Kurt Lewin. Ambivalence has a longer history.Template:Fix/category[citation needed]

Criterion for Emotion

Valence is one criterion used in some definitions of emotion. The possible absence of valence is cited as a reason to exclude surprise, viewed as the startle reaction, from the list of emotions, though some would include it.

Measurement

Valence could be assigned a number and treated as if it were measured, but the validity of a measurement based on a subjective report is questionable. Measurement based on observations of facial expressions, using FACS, and microexpressions (See Ekman.) or on modern functional brain imaging may overcome this objection.

Footnotes

  1. Nico H. Frijda, The Emotions. Cambridge(UK): Cambridge University Press, 1986. p. 207

References

See also

External links


Linked-in.jpg