Tuberculous pericarditis chest X ray

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Tuberculous pericarditis Microchapters

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Patient Information

Overview

Pathophysiology

Differentiating Tuberculous Pericarditis from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

Approach

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Electrocardiogram

Chest X Ray

MRI

Echocardiography or Ultrasound

Cardiac catheterization

Treatment

Medical therapy

Anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy

Pericardiocentesis

Pericardiectomy

Case Studies

Case #1

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor-In-Chief: Varun Kumar, M.B.B.S.; Lakshmi Gopalakrishnan, M.B.B.S.

Chest X-ray

Pulmonary infiltration by the bacterium may be seen in approximately 32% of cases[1], pleural effusion in 40% to 60%, and cardiomegaly in about 90% of patients with tuberculous pericarditis[2][3].

Image shown below is courtesy of Radiopedia

14 year old child with tubercular pleural and pericardial effusion. Decortication was performed on the left side. The pericardial effusion was aspirated with a wide bore needle on 3 occasions, it reaccumulated immediately.


References

  1. Fowler NO, Manitsas GT (1973). "Infectious pericarditis". Prog Cardiovasc Dis. 16 (3): 323–36. PMID 4593515.
  2. Reuter H, Burgess LJ, Doubell AF (2005). "Role of chest radiography in diagnosing patients with tuberculous pericarditis". Cardiovasc J S Afr. 16 (2): 108–11. PMID 15915278.
  3. Rooney JJ, Crocco JA, Lyons HA (1970). "Tuberculous pericarditis". Ann Intern Med. 72 (1): 73–81. PMID 5410398.



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