Superior semicircular canal

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Superior semicircular canal
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Interior of right osseous labyrinth.
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Latin canalis semicircularis anterior, canalis semicircularis superior
Gray's subject #232 1049
Artery stylomastoid artery
MeSH Semicircular+canals
Dorlands/Elsevier c_04/12208843

The superior semicircular canal (anterior semicircular canal) is a part of the vestibular system and detects rotation of the head around a rostral-caudal (anterior-posterior) axis.

Structure

It is 15 to 20 mm in length, is vertical in direction, and is placed transversely to the long axis of the petrous portion of the temporal bone, on the anterior surface of which its arch forms a round projection. As part of the vestibular system it detects rotation of the head around a rostral-caudal (anterior-posterior) axis.

It describes about two-thirds of a circle.

Its lateral extremity is ampullated, and opens into the upper part of the vestibule; the opposite end joins with the upper part of the posterior canal to form the crus commune, which opens into the upper and medial part of the vestibule.

See also

Additional images

This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated. Please edit the article if this is the case, and feel free to remove this notice when it is no longer relevant.

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