Pubococcygeus muscle

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Pubococcygeus muscle
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Muscles of the lower abdomen.
Latin musculus pubococcygeus
Gray's subject #119 424
Origin back of the pubis and from the anterior part of the obturator fascia
Insertion    coccyx and sacrum
Artery:
Nerve: S3, S4
Action: controls urine flow and contracts during orgasm
Dorlands
/Elsevier
m_22/12550316

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Overview

The pubococcygeus muscle or PC muscle is a hammock-like muscle, found in both sexes, that stretches from the pubic bone to the coccyx (tail bone) forming the floor of the pelvic cavity and supporting the pelvic organs. It is part of the levator ani group of muscles.

It surrounds the rectum, the vagina (in women) and bladder openings.

Function

It controls urine flow and contracts during orgasm. It aids in urinary control, and childbirth.

A well-developed pubococcygeus muscle can enhance sex and orgasm in both sexes.

A strong PC muscle has also been attributed to a reduction in urinary incontinence and proper positioning of the baby's head during childbirth.

The PC Muscle also allows the male to move the penis up and down while the penis is erect

Kegel exercises

Kegel exercises are a set of exercises designed to strengthen and give voluntary control over the pubococcygeus muscles. They are often referred to simply as "kegels." These exercises also serve to contract the cremaster muscle in men, as voluntary contraction of the pubococcygeus muscle also engages the cremasteric reflex, which also has sexual benefits. This will make the penis rise, and control can be achieved with practice.

Kegel exercises appear to enable some men to have multiple orgasms and can help with premature ejaculation.

Anatomy

The Pubococcygeus arises from the back of the pubis and from the anterior part of the obturator fascia, and is directed backward almost horizontally along the side of the anal canal toward the coccyx and sacrum, to which it finds attachment.

Between the termination of the vertebral column and the anus, the two Pubococcygei muscles come together and form a thick, fibromuscular layer lying on the raphé(anococcygeal raphé) formed by the Iliococcygei.

The greater part of this muscle is inserted into the coccyx and into the last one or two pieces of the sacrum.

This insertion into the vertebral column is, however, not admitted by all observers.

See also

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| group5 = Clinical Trials Involving Pubococcygeus muscle | list5 = Ongoing Trials on Pubococcygeus muscle at Clinical Trials.govTrial results on Pubococcygeus muscleClinical Trials on Pubococcygeus muscle at Google


| group6 = Guidelines / Policies / Government Resources (FDA/CDC) Regarding Pubococcygeus muscle | list6 = US National Guidelines Clearinghouse on Pubococcygeus muscleNICE Guidance on Pubococcygeus muscleNHS PRODIGY GuidanceFDA on Pubococcygeus muscleCDC on Pubococcygeus muscle


| group7 = Textbook Information on Pubococcygeus muscle | list7 = Books and Textbook Information on Pubococcygeus muscle


| group8 = Pharmacology Resources on Pubococcygeus muscle | list8 = AND (Dose)}} Dosing of Pubococcygeus muscleAND (drug interactions)}} Drug interactions with Pubococcygeus muscleAND (side effects)}} Side effects of Pubococcygeus muscleAND (Allergy)}} Allergic reactions to Pubococcygeus muscleAND (overdose)}} Overdose information on Pubococcygeus muscleAND (carcinogenicity)}} Carcinogenicity information on Pubococcygeus muscleAND (pregnancy)}} Pubococcygeus muscle in pregnancyAND (pharmacokinetics)}} Pharmacokinetics of Pubococcygeus muscle


| group9 = Genetics, Pharmacogenomics, and Proteinomics of Pubococcygeus muscle | list9 = AND (pharmacogenomics)}} Genetics of Pubococcygeus muscleAND (pharmacogenomics)}} Pharmacogenomics of Pubococcygeus muscleAND (proteomics)}} Proteomics of Pubococcygeus muscle


| group10 = Newstories on Pubococcygeus muscle | list10 = Pubococcygeus muscle in the newsBe alerted to news on Pubococcygeus muscleNews trends on Pubococcygeus muscle


| group11 = Commentary on Pubococcygeus muscle | list11 = Blogs on Pubococcygeus muscle

| group12 = Patient Resources on Pubococcygeus muscle | list12 = Patient resources on Pubococcygeus muscleDiscussion groups on Pubococcygeus musclePatient Handouts on Pubococcygeus muscleDirections to Hospitals Treating Pubococcygeus muscleRisk calculators and risk factors for Pubococcygeus muscle


| group13 = Healthcare Provider Resources on Pubococcygeus muscle | list13 = Symptoms of Pubococcygeus muscleCauses & Risk Factors for Pubococcygeus muscleDiagnostic studies for Pubococcygeus muscleTreatment of Pubococcygeus muscle

| group14 = Continuing Medical Education (CME) Programs on Pubococcygeus muscle | list14 = CME Programs on Pubococcygeus muscle

| group15 = International Resources on Pubococcygeus muscle | list15 = Pubococcygeus muscle en EspanolPubococcygeus muscle en Francais

| group16 = Business Resources on Pubococcygeus muscle | list16 = Pubococcygeus muscle in the MarketplacePatents on Pubococcygeus muscle

| group17 = Informatics Resources on Pubococcygeus muscle | list17 = List of terms related to Pubococcygeus muscle


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