Niacin/lovastatin

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Niacin/lovastatin
ADVICOR® FDA Package Insert
Indications and Usage
Dosage and Administration
Dosage Forms and Strengths
Contraindications
Warnings and Precautions
Adverse Reactions
Drug Interactions
Use in Specific Populations
Overdosage
Description
Clinical Pharmacology
Nonclinical Toxicology
Clinical Studies
How Supplied/Storage and Handling
Patient Counseling Information
Labels and Packages
Clinical Trials on Niacin/lovastatin
ClinicalTrials.gov

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Sheng Shi, M.D. [2]

Synonyms / Brand Names: ADVICOR®

Overview

Niacin/lovastatin (trade names Advicor, Mevacor) is a drug combination used for the treatment of dyslipidemia. It is a combination of the vitamin niacin and the statin drug lovastatin. The combination preparation is marketed by Abbott Laboratories

It was approved by the FDA on December 17, 2001.

Category

Combination drugs;Hypolipidemic agents;Cardiovascular Drugs;

FDA Package Insert

Indications and Usage | Dosage and Administration | Dosage Forms and Strengths | Contraindications | Warnings and Precautions | Adverse Reactions | Drug Interactions | Use in Specific Populations | Overdosage | Description | Clinical Pharmacology | Nonclinical Toxicology | Clinical Studies | How Supplied/Storage and Handling | Patient Counseling Information | Labels and Packages

Mechanism of Action

Niacin

The mechanism by which niacin alters lipid profiles is not completely understood and may involve several actions, including partial inhibition of release of free fatty acids from adipose tissue, and increased lipoprotein lipase activity (which may increase the rate of chylomicron triglyceride removal from plasma). Niacin decreases the rate of hepatic synthesis of VLDL-C and LDL-C, and does not appear to affect fecal excretion of fats, sterols, or bile acids.

Lovastatin

Lovastatin is a specific inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonate. The conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonate is an early step in the biosynthetic pathway for cholesterol. Lovastatin is a prodrug and has little, if any, activity until hydrolyzed to its active beta-hydroxyacid form, lovastatin acid. The mechanism of the LDL-lowering effect of lovastatin may involve both reduction of VLDL-C concentration and induction of the LDL receptor, leading to reduced production and/or increased catabolism of LDL-C.

Interaction with Alcohol

ADVICOR should be used with caution in patients who consume substantial quantities of alcohol and/or have a past history of liver disease.Patients should be advised to avoid ingestion of alcohol, hot beverages and spicy foods around the time of ADVICOR administration.

References


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