Inguinal triangle

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Inguinal triangle
Hesselbach triangle 547.gif
Internal view of right inguinal area.

Inguinal triangle is not labeled, but can be seen at center left, by tracing out the margins of the three surrounding structures:
inferior epigastric vessels: Run from upper left to center.
inguinal ligament: Runs from upper right to bottom left.
rectus abdominis muscle: Runs from upper left to bottom left, labeled rectus at upper left.
Gray398.png
External view.

Inguinal triangle is not labeled, but region can be inferred, albeit less clearly than with the diagram above:
inferior epigastric artery and vein: labeled at center left, and run from upper right to bottom center.
inguinal ligament: not labeled on diagram, but runs a similar path to the inguinal aponeurotic falx, labeled at bottom.
rectus abdominis muscle: runs from upper left to bottom left.
Latin trigonum inguinale
Dorlands/Elsevier t_19/12823490

In human anatomy, the inguinal triangle is a region of the abdominal wall. It is also known by the eponym Hesselbach's triangle, after Franz Kaspar Hesselbach.[1]

Boundaries

It is defined by the following structures:[2][3]

Clinical significance

It is the region in which direct inguinal hernias protrude through the abdominal wall.[4]

See also

References

  1. synd/3216 at Who Named It
  2. Crowe. Anatomy Lecture 10/1/99 Abdominal Wall and Hernias. Howard University. URL: http://www.students.med.howard.edu/2003/archives/anatomy/10-1-99-second-hour.htm. Accessed December 15, 2005.
  3. SUR38 at FPnotebook
  4. MedNote. Red Anatomy. URL: http://www.mednote.co.kr/Rednote/RedAnatom.htm. Accessed December 15, 2005.

External links



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