Adenoma (patient information)

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Adenoma

Overview

What are the symptoms?

What are the causes?

Who is at highest risk?

Diagnosis

Treatment options

Where to find medical care for Adenoma?

What to expect (Outlook/Prognosis)?

Adenoma On the Web

Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

Images of Adenoma

Videos on Adenoma

FDA on Adenoma

CDC on Adenoma

Adenoma in the news

Blogs on Adenoma

Directions to Hospitals Treating Adenoma

Risk calculators and risk factors for Adenoma

For the WikiDoc page for this topic, click here Editor-in-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S.,M.D. [1] Phone:617-632-7753; Associate Editor-In-Chief: Jinhui Wu, M.D.

Overview

Tumors are abnormal growths in your body. They are made up of extra cells. Normally, old cells die, and new ones take their place. Sometimes, however, this process goes wrong. New cells form even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. When these extra cells form a mass, it is called a tumor.

Tumors can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. Benign tumors cannot spread or invade other parts of your body. Even so, they can be dangerous if they press on vital organs, such as your brain.

An adenoma is a type of benign tumor which begins from glandular cell in the body. Glands, such as sweat, saliva, breast milk, mucous, and hormones, are specific part of epithelial cells that are used for secretion.

What are the symptoms of Adenoma?

Symptoms of adenomas vary widely. It depends on the size, the location of the adenomas.

What causes Adenoma?

The causes of adenoma are not clear. But heredity and environment may be related to the development of adenoma. For example, studies suggest that person with the family history of colon adenomas has more chance to get the disease than others without famliy history.

Who is at highest risk?

Women who use oral contraceptives may be at increased risk of developing liver adenomas.

Diagnosis

Adenomas can be diagnosed by a variety of techniques, including the collection of blood and urine samples, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) scanning, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Biopsy is the best way to tell whether the tumor is benign or malignant.

Treatment options

Surgery to remove the adenoma is recommended for the treatment of adenomas.

Where to find medical care for Adenoma?

Directions to Hospitals Treating Adenoma

What to expect (Outlook/Prognosis)?

Benign tumors usually don't grow back.

Source


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