Acromegaly diagnosis

Jump to: navigation, search

Acromegaly Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Acromegaly from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Electrocardiogram

X Ray

CT

MRI

Ultrasound

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Radiation Therapy

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Acromegaly diagnosis On the Web

Most recent articles

cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Acromegaly diagnosis

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Acromegaly diagnosis

CDC on Acromegaly diagnosis

Acromegaly diagnosis in the news

Blogs on Acromegaly diagnosis

Directions to Hospitals Treating Acromegaly

Risk calculators and risk factors for Acromegaly diagnosis

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

Diagnosis

If acromegaly is suspected, medical imaging and medical laboratory investigations are generally used together to confirm or rule out the presence of this condition.

Hormonal

IGF1 provides the most sensitive and useful lab test for the diagnosis of acromegaly. A single value of the Growth hormone (GH) is not useful in view of its pulsatality (levels in the blood vary greatly even in healthy individuals). GH levels taken 2 hours after a 75 or 100 gram glucose tolerance test are helpful in the diagnosis: GH levels are suppressed below 1 μg/L in normal people, and levels higher than this cutoff are confirmatory of acromegaly.

Other pituitary hormones have to be assessed to address the secretory effects of the tumour as well as the mass effect of the tumor on the normal pituitary gland. They include TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone),gonadotropic hormones (FSH,LH), ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone), prolactin.

Radiological

An MRI of the brain focussing on the sella turcica after gadolinium administration allows for clear delineation of the pituitary and the hypothalamus and the location of the tumour.

References

bg:Акромегалия cs:Akromegalie de:Akromegalie gl:Acromegalia it:Acromegalia he:אקרומגליה nl:Acromegalie no:Akromegali sq:Akromegalia sk:Akromegália sr:Акромегалија fi:Akromegalia sv:Akromegali uk:Акромегалія



Linked-in.jpg