Abdominal mass differential diagnosis

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Differential Diagnosis

  • Abdominal aortic aneurysm can cause a pulsating mass around the navel.
  • Bladder distention (urinary bladder over-filled with fluid) can cause a firm mass in the center of the lower abdomen above the pelvic bones, in extreme cases it can reach as far up as the navel.
  • Cholecystitis can cause a very tender mass that is felt below the liver in the right-upper quadrant (occasionally).
  • Colon cancer and Volvulus can cause a mass at any location in the abdomen.
  • Crohn's disease or bowel obstruction can cause many tender, sausage-shaped masses anywhere in the abdomen.
  • Diverticulitis can cause a mass that is usually located in the left-lower quadrant.
  • Gallbladder tumor can cause a tender, irregularly shaped mass in the right-upper quadrant.
  • Hydronephrosis (fluid-filled kidney) can cause a smooth, spongy-feeling mass in one or both sides or toward the back (flank area).
  • Kidney cancer can sometimes cause a mass in the abdomen.
  • Liver cancer can cause a firm, lumpy mass in the right upper quadrant.
  • Liver enlargement (hepatomegaly) can cause a firm, irregular mass below the right rib cage, or on the left side in the stomach area.
  • Neuroblastoma, a cancerous tumor, often found in the lower abdomen, that mainly occurs in children and infants.
  • Ovarian cyst can cause a smooth, rounded, rubbery mass above the pelvis in the lower abdomen.
  • Pancreatic abscess can cause a mass in the upper abdomen in the epigastric area.
  • Pancreatic pseudocyst can cause a lumpy mass in the upper abdomen in the epigastric area.
  • Renal cell carcinoma can cause a smooth, firm, but not tender mass near the kidney (usually only affects one kidney).
  • Spleen enlargement (splenomegaly) can sometimes be felt in the left-upper quadrant.
  • Stomach cancer can cause a mass in the left-upper abdomen in the stomach area (epigastric) if the cancer is large.
  • Uterine leiomyoma (fibroids) can cause a round, lumpy mass above the pelvis in the lower abdomen (sometimes can be felt if the fibroids are large).
  • Ureteropelvic junction obstruction can cause a mass in the lower abdomen.

References


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