Abandoned child syndrome

Jump to: navigation, search

WikiDoc Resources for Abandoned child syndrome

Articles

Most recent articles on Abandoned child syndrome

Most cited articles on Abandoned child syndrome

Review articles on Abandoned child syndrome

Articles on Abandoned child syndrome in N Eng J Med, Lancet, BMJ

Media

Powerpoint slides on Abandoned child syndrome

Images of Abandoned child syndrome

Photos of Abandoned child syndrome

Podcasts & MP3s on Abandoned child syndrome

Videos on Abandoned child syndrome

Evidence Based Medicine

Cochrane Collaboration on Abandoned child syndrome

Bandolier on Abandoned child syndrome

TRIP on Abandoned child syndrome

Clinical Trials

Ongoing Trials on Abandoned child syndrome at Clinical Trials.gov

Trial results on Abandoned child syndrome

Clinical Trials on Abandoned child syndrome at Google

Guidelines / Policies / Govt

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse on Abandoned child syndrome

NICE Guidance on Abandoned child syndrome

NHS PRODIGY Guidance

FDA on Abandoned child syndrome

CDC on Abandoned child syndrome

Books

Books on Abandoned child syndrome

News

Abandoned child syndrome in the news

Be alerted to news on Abandoned child syndrome

News trends on Abandoned child syndrome

Commentary

Blogs on Abandoned child syndrome

Definitions

Definitions of Abandoned child syndrome

Patient Resources / Community

Patient resources on Abandoned child syndrome

Discussion groups on Abandoned child syndrome

Patient Handouts on Abandoned child syndrome

Directions to Hospitals Treating Abandoned child syndrome

Risk calculators and risk factors for Abandoned child syndrome

Healthcare Provider Resources

Symptoms of Abandoned child syndrome

Causes & Risk Factors for Abandoned child syndrome

Diagnostic studies for Abandoned child syndrome

Treatment of Abandoned child syndrome

Continuing Medical Education (CME)

CME Programs on Abandoned child syndrome

International

Abandoned child syndrome en Espanol

Abandoned child syndrome en Francais

Business

Abandoned child syndrome in the Marketplace

Patents on Abandoned child syndrome

Experimental / Informatics

List of terms related to Abandoned child syndrome

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

Overview

Abandoned child syndrome is a behavioral or psychological condition that results from the loss of one or both parents. Abandonment may be physical (the parent is not present in the child's life) or emotional (the parent withholds affection, nurturing, or stimulation). Many countries, like Russia and China, have an alarmingly high rate of physically abandoned children. A 1998 Human Rights Watch committee report found that more than 100,000 children per year were abandoned in Russia. Parents leave their children for many reasons, including trouble with the law, financial insecurity, the child is mentally or physically challenged, and sometimes population control policies. Involuntary loss of a parent, such as through divorce or death, can also create abandonment issues.

Parents who leave their children, whether with or without good reason, can cause irreversible psychological damage to the child.[1] Abandoned children may also often suffer physical damage from neglect, malnutrition, starvation, and abuse. Substantial research indicates that contact with adults of both sexes encourages a child's balanced development.[2]

Abandoned Child Syndrome is not listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (fourth edition). [3]

Symptoms

Symptoms may be physical and/or mental, and may extend into adulthood and perhaps throughout a person's life.

  • Alienation from the environment - withdrawal from social activities, resistance towards others [4]
  • Guilt - the child believes that he did something wrong that caused the abandonment (often associated with depression) [5]
  • Fear and uncertainty - clinginess, insecurities [6]
  • Sleep and eating disorders - malnutrition, starvation, disturbed sleep, nightmares [6]
  • Physical ailments - fatigue, depression, lack of energy and creativity, anger, grief [6]

Recovery

For children, creative play is a non-threatening way to work through stressful and traumatic situations. Creative play gives children an outlet to make something "better" and helps them overcome feelings of powerlessness. [7]

For adults, writing about the experience (journaling, unsent letters, putting their feelings into words) can often be helpful.[6]

Notes

See also

Henley, Arthur. "The abandoned child." Deviancy and the family. Ed. Clifton D. Bryant and J. Gipson Wells. Philadelphia: F. A. Davis, 1973. 199-208.



Linked-in.jpg