Difference between revisions of "Palmar plantar erythrodysesthesia history and symptoms"

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==History and Symptoms==
 
==History and Symptoms==
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===History===
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Patients with palmar plantar erythrodysesthesia have a positive history of treatment with chemotherapeutic agents.
  
 
=== Common Symptoms ===
 
=== Common Symptoms ===
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* A well-defined edema and symmetrical erythema, more prominently over the fat pads of the distal phalanges  
 
* A well-defined edema and symmetrical erythema, more prominently over the fat pads of the distal phalanges  
 
* Skip areas may be seen
 
  
 
* Extension to the dorsal surfaces of the extremities, or over joint surfaces can occur <ref name="pmid2061446">{{cite journal| author=Baack BR, Burgdorf WH| title=Chemotherapy-induced acral erythema. | journal=J Am Acad Dermatol | year= 1991 | volume= 24 | issue= 3 | pages= 457-61 | pmid=2061446 | doi= | pmc= | url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/eutils/elink.fcgi?dbfrom=pubmed&tool=sumsearch.org/cite&retmode=ref&cmd=prlinks&id=2061446  }} </ref>
 
* Extension to the dorsal surfaces of the extremities, or over joint surfaces can occur <ref name="pmid2061446">{{cite journal| author=Baack BR, Burgdorf WH| title=Chemotherapy-induced acral erythema. | journal=J Am Acad Dermatol | year= 1991 | volume= 24 | issue= 3 | pages= 457-61 | pmid=2061446 | doi= | pmc= | url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/eutils/elink.fcgi?dbfrom=pubmed&tool=sumsearch.org/cite&retmode=ref&cmd=prlinks&id=2061446  }} </ref>

Revision as of 15:47, 12 July 2019

Palmar plantar erythrodysesthesia Microchapters

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Mandana Chitsazan, M.D. [2]

Overview

The most common symptoms of PPE include tingling, burning pain, edema, and erythema. Less common symptoms of PPE include sensory impairment, paresthesia, and pruritus.

History and Symptoms

History

Patients with palmar plantar erythrodysesthesia have a positive history of treatment with chemotherapeutic agents.

Common Symptoms

The most common symptoms of PPE include:

  • A prodrome of dysesthesia, usually as a tingling sensation in the fingers, palms and/or soles, progressing to a burning pain in a few days
  • A well-defined edema and symmetrical erythema, more prominently over the fat pads of the distal phalanges
  • Extension to the dorsal surfaces of the extremities, or over joint surfaces can occur [1]
  • Periungual skin involvement is also possible
  • The palms of the hands are usually more frequently and more severely affected than the soles of the feet, and may be only are affected.[1] [2]

Less Common Symptoms

Less common symptoms include: [3] [4]

  • Sensory impairment
  • paresthesia
  • pruritus
  • A bullous variant (a severe form of this entity) specifically occurs with cytarabine or methotrexate.[5][6]

Involvement of other parts of the body is rare, even though mild erythema or morbilliform lesions might occasionally be seen on the trunk, trunk, neck, chest, scalp and extremities. [1] [7]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Baack BR, Burgdorf WH (1991). "Chemotherapy-induced acral erythema". J Am Acad Dermatol. 24 (3): 457–61. PMID 2061446.
  2. Lassere Y, Hoff P (2004). "Management of hand-foot syndrome in patients treated with capecitabine (Xeloda)". Eur J Oncol Nurs. 8 Suppl 1: S31–40. doi:10.1016/j.ejon.2004.06.007. PMID 15341880.
  3. Hui YF, Cortes JE (2000). "Palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome associated with liposomal daunorubicin". Pharmacotherapy. 20 (10): 1221–3. PMID 11034047.
  4. "www.oncologynurseadvisor.com".
  5. Hellier I, Bessis D, Sotto A, Margueritte G, Guilhou JJ (1996). "High-dose methotrexate-induced bullous variant of acral erythema". Arch Dermatol. 132 (5): 590–1. PMID 8624164.
  6. Waltzer JF, Flowers FP (1993). "Bullous variant of chemotherapy-induced acral erythema". Arch Dermatol. 129 (1): 43–5. PMID 8420487.
  7. Kroll SS, Koller CA, Kaled S, Dreizen S (1989). "Chemotherapy-induced acral erythema: desquamating lesions involving the hands and feet". Ann Plast Surg. 23 (3): 263–5. PMID 2528937.

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