Difference between revisions of "Ovarian cancer historical perspective"

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==Overview==
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==Historical Perspective==
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* In the 16th and 17th centuries, Dr. Lusitani and Dr. Tulp from Holand, believed that cancers are contagious after they noticed the presence of breast cancers in the same household members.
 
* In the 16th and 17th centuries, Dr. Lusitani and Dr. Tulp from Holand, believed that cancers are contagious after they noticed the presence of breast cancers in the same household members.
 
* In 1990, Dr. Mary-Claire King, the professor of genome sciences from Chicago, was the first one to link the single gene on chromosome 17 to many breast and ovarian cancers, after many years of research to find evidence that there is a genetic pattern linked to the incidence of complex diseases.
 
* In 1990, Dr. Mary-Claire King, the professor of genome sciences from Chicago, was the first one to link the single gene on chromosome 17 to many breast and ovarian cancers, after many years of research to find evidence that there is a genetic pattern linked to the incidence of complex diseases.
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* 1996, King and the Breast Cancer research foundation, conducted a study on women of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry in NYC and also on Palestinian women, which lead to the definitive confirmation that mutations in BRCAa and BRCA2 is linked to the incidence of ovarian and breast cancer.  
 
* 1996, King and the Breast Cancer research foundation, conducted a study on women of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry in NYC and also on Palestinian women, which lead to the definitive confirmation that mutations in BRCAa and BRCA2 is linked to the incidence of ovarian and breast cancer.  
 
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== References ==
 
== References ==
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Revision as of 19:25, 12 July 2019

Ovarian cancer Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classifications

Pathophysiology

Causes of Ovarian cancer

Differentiating Ovarian cancer from other Diseases

Epidemiology & Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications & Prognosis

Diagnosis

History & Symptoms

Physical Examination

Staging

Laboratory Findings

Chest X Ray

CT

MRI

Echocardiography or Ultrasound

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Ovarian cancer historical perspective On the Web

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X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

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NICE Guidance

FDA on Ovarian cancer historical perspective

CDC on Ovarian cancer historical perspective

Ovarian cancer historical perspective in the news

Blogs on Ovarian cancer historical perspective

Directions to Hospitals Treating Ovarian cancer

Risk calculators and risk factors for Ovarian cancer historical perspective

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Huda A. Karman, M.D.

Overview

zzz

Historical Perspective

  • In the 16th and 17th centuries, Dr. Lusitani and Dr. Tulp from Holand, believed that cancers are contagious after they noticed the presence of breast cancers in the same household members.
  • In 1990, Dr. Mary-Claire King, the professor of genome sciences from Chicago, was the first one to link the single gene on chromosome 17 to many breast and ovarian cancers, after many years of research to find evidence that there is a genetic pattern linked to the incidence of complex diseases.
  • In 1991, King named the gene that is linked to many breast and ovarian cancers as BRCA1.
  • In 1994, King also found and named the second gene, BRCA2 on chromosome 13.
  • 1996, King and the Breast Cancer research foundation, conducted a study on women of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry in NYC and also on Palestinian women, which lead to the definitive confirmation that mutations in BRCAa and BRCA2 is linked to the incidence of ovarian and breast cancer.

References


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