Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor surgery

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Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor Microchapters

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Differentiating Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor from other Diseases

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Marjan Khan M.B.B.S.[2]

Overview

Surgery is the mainstay of treatment for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor.

Surgery

  • The first-line treatment is surgical resection with wide margins. The removal of the tumor along with surrounding tissue may be vital for the patient’s survival.[1]
  • For discrete, localized tumors, surgery is often followed by radiation therapy of the excised area to reduce the chance of recurrence.
  • For patients suffering from neurofibrosarcomas in an extremity, if the tumor is vascularized and has many nerves going through it and/or around it, amputation of the extremity may be necessary. Some surgeons argue that amputation should be the procedure of choice when possible, due to the increased chance of a better quality of life. Otherwise, surgeons may opt for a limb-saving treatment, by removing less of the surrounding tissue or part of the bone, which is replaced by a metal rod or grafts.

References


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