Inferior thyroid veins

Revision as of 16:23, 9 August 2012 by WikiBot (talk | contribs) (Robot: Automated text replacement (-{{SIB}} + & -{{EH}} + & -{{EJ}} + & -{{Editor Help}} + & -{{Editor Join}} +))
(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Template:Infobox Vein

Cardiology Network
Wikidoc-cardiology-network.jpg
Discuss Inferior thyroid veins further in the WikiDoc Cardiology Network
Adult Congenital
Biomarkers
Cardiac Rehabilitation
Congestive Heart Failure
CT Angiography
Echocardiography
Electrophysiology
Cardiology General
Genetics
Health Economics
Hypertension
Interventional Cardiology
MRI
Nuclear Cardiology
Peripheral Arterial Disease
Prevention
Public Policy
Pulmonary Embolism
Stable Angina
Valvular Heart Disease
Vascular Medicine

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]



The inferior thyroid veins two, frequently three or four, in number, arise in the venous plexus on the thyroid gland, communicating with the middle and superior thyroid veins.

They form a plexus in front of the trachea, behind the Sternothyreoidei.

From this plexus, a left vein descends and joins the left innominate trunk, and a right vein passes obliquely downward and to the right across the innominate artery to open into the right innominate vein, just at its junction with the superior vena cava; sometimes the right and left veins open by a common trunk in the latter situation.

These veins receive esophageal tracheal, and inferior laryngeal veins, and are provided with valves at their terminations in the innominate veins.

Additional images

Template:Gray's Template:Veins

Template:WikiDoc Sources