Difference between revisions of "Dilated cardiomyopathy echocardiography"

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(Overview)
 
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{{CMG}}; '''Associate Editor-in-Chief:''' Sachin Shah, M.D.
 
{{CMG}}; '''Associate Editor-in-Chief:''' Sachin Shah, M.D.
 
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==Overview==
 
==Overview==
 
[[Echocardiography]] is the most common imaging finding used to diagnose dilated cardiomyopathy. Findings may include ventricular and atrial dilatation, increased left ventricular mass, a global reduction in systolic function, and focal wall motion abnormalities.
 
[[Echocardiography]] is the most common imaging finding used to diagnose dilated cardiomyopathy. Findings may include ventricular and atrial dilatation, increased left ventricular mass, a global reduction in systolic function, and focal wall motion abnormalities.
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*LV (left ventricular) wall thickness usually is normal but given the dilation the LV mass is increased  
 
*LV (left ventricular) wall thickness usually is normal but given the dilation the LV mass is increased  
 
*In addition there is a global reduction in systolic function
 
*In addition there is a global reduction in systolic function
*Occasionally there may also be focal wall motion abnormalities even in patients without flow limiting [[coronary artery disease]]<ref> Mayo Clinic Cardiology. Concise Textbook. Murphy, Joseph G; Lloyd, Margaret A. Mayo Clinic Scientific Press. 2007.</ref>
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*Occasionally there may also be focal wall motion abnormalities even in patients without flow limiting [[coronary artery disease]]<ref> Mayo Clinic Cardiology. Concise Textbook. Murphy, Joseph G; Lloyd, Margaret A. Mayo Clinic Scientific Press. 2007.</ref>
  
 
The diagnosis requires a dilated left ventricle and low [[ejection fraction]].
 
The diagnosis requires a dilated left ventricle and low [[ejection fraction]].

Latest revision as of 17:57, 4 December 2019

Dilated cardiomyopathy Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Dilated cardiomyopathy from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Electrocardiogram

Chest X Ray

CT

MRI

Echocardiography

Other Imaging Findings

Genetic testing

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Dilated cardiomyopathy echocardiography On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Dilated cardiomyopathy echocardiography

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Dilated cardiomyopathy echocardiography

CDC on Dilated cardiomyopathy echocardiography

Dilated cardiomyopathy echocardiography in the news

Blogs on Dilated cardiomyopathy echocardiography

Directions to Hospitals Treating Dilated cardiomyopathy

Risk calculators and risk factors for Dilated cardiomyopathy echocardiography

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor-in-Chief: Sachin Shah, M.D.

Overview

Echocardiography is the most common imaging finding used to diagnose dilated cardiomyopathy. Findings may include ventricular and atrial dilatation, increased left ventricular mass, a global reduction in systolic function, and focal wall motion abnormalities.

Echocardiography

The diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy is based on clinical presentation and imaging findings. The most common imaging modality used to diagnose dilated cardiomyopathy is 2D-echocardiography. Echocardiographic findings of dilated cardiomyopathy include:

  • Dilation of the left ventricle; however, may include dilatation of all 4 cardiac chambers
  • LV (left ventricular) wall thickness usually is normal but given the dilation the LV mass is increased
  • In addition there is a global reduction in systolic function
  • Occasionally there may also be focal wall motion abnormalities even in patients without flow limiting coronary artery disease[1]

The diagnosis requires a dilated left ventricle and low ejection fraction.

References

  1. Mayo Clinic Cardiology. Concise Textbook. Murphy, Joseph G; Lloyd, Margaret A. Mayo Clinic Scientific Press. 2007.



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