Cervical cancer historical perspective

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Nima Nasiri, M.D.[2]

Overview

In 400 BC, Hippocrates referred to cervical cancer as cancer of the uterus, it was little known about cervical cancer until the Rennaissance era. In 1842, an Italian physician named Rigoni-stern noticed that cancer of the cervix prevalence was high among married and widowed women and low or rare among the unmarried women and absent in Italian nuns.

Historical Perspective

  • In 400 BC, Hippocrates referred to cervical cancer as cancer of the uterus which should be left untreated since there is no cure for it.[1][2]
  • In 1842, an Italian physician named Rigoni-stern noticed that cancer of the cervix prevalence was high among married and widowed women and low or rare among the unmarried women and absent in Italian nuns.[3]
  • In 1941, The Papanicolaou smear, a routine screening test for cervical cancer, proved by George Nicholaus Papanicolaou.[4][5]
  • In 1970s, Harold zur Hausen, a German physician, first discovered that infection with papillomavirus is cause of cervical cancer, his research included HPV types 16 and 18 as main cause of increased risk for cervical neoplasia.[6][7]
  • In 2006, first HPV vaccine was approved by FDA . [8]

References

  1. Nor Hayati O (January 2003). "Cancer of the cervix - from bleak past to bright future; a review, with an emphasis on cancer of the cervix in malaysia". Malays J Med Sci. 10 (1): 13–26. PMID 23365496.
  2. Di Lonardo, Anna; Nasi, Sergio; Pulciani, Simonetta (2015). "Cancer: We Should Not Forget The Past". Journal of Cancer. 6 (1): 29–39. doi:10.7150/jca.10336. ISSN 1837-9664.
  3. Nor Hayati O (January 2003). "Cancer of the cervix - from bleak past to bright future; a review, with an emphasis on cancer of the cervix in malaysia". Malays J Med Sci. 10 (1): 13–26. PMID 23365496.
  4. Vilos GA (March 1998). "The history of the Papanicolaou smear and the odyssey of George and Andromache Papanicolaou". Obstet Gynecol. 91 (3): 479–83. PMID 9491881.
  5. Michalas, Stylianos P. (2000). "The Pap test: George N. Papanicolaou (1883–1962)". European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology. 90 (2): 135–138. doi:10.1016/S0301-2115(00)00260-8. ISSN 0301-2115.
  6. . doi:10.1097/PAP.0b013e3182862aab. Check |doi= value (help). Missing or empty |title= (help)
  7. Nour NM (2009). "Cervical cancer: a preventable death". Rev Obstet Gynecol. 2 (4): 240–4. PMID 20111660.
  8. Kelly, Bridget J.; Leader, Amy E.; Mittermaier, Danielle J.; Hornik, Robert C.; Cappella, Joseph N. (2009). "The HPV vaccine and the media: How has the topic been covered and what are the effects on knowledge about the virus and cervical cancer?". Patient Education and Counseling. 77 (2): 308–313. doi:10.1016/j.pec.2009.03.018. ISSN 0738-3991.

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