Difference between revisions of "Cerebral aneurysm historical perspective"

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__NOTOC__
{{Cerebral aneurysm}}
{{CMG}}; {{AE}} {{Jose}}
==Overview==
Cerebral aneurysm was first described by X.
==Historical Perspective==
<big>Cerebral aneurysm is defined as</big>
<big>Cerebral aneurysm is defined as</big>



Revision as of 18:58, 9 May 2022

Cerebral aneurysm Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Cerebral aneurysm from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

Diagnostic Criteria

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

CT

MRI

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Primary Prevention

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Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

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Case #1

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: José Eduardo Riceto Loyola Junior, M.D.[2]

Overview

Cerebral aneurysm was first described by X.

Historical Perspective

Cerebral aneurysm is defined as

  • dilations that occur along the weak points along the arterial circulations within brain. [1]

Size:

  • small less than 0.5mm
  • Medium 6 to 25mm
  • Large greater than 25mm


Types:

  1. Berry aneurysm
  2. Fusiform
  3. Mycotic

Prevalence:

The worldwide prevalence of cerebral aneurysms is approximately 3.2%, with a mean age of 50 and an overall 1:1 gender ratio. This ratio changes significantly after age 50, with an increasing female predominance approaching 2:1, thought to be due to decreased circulating estrogen causing a reduction in the collagen content of the vascular tissue.[1]

References

  1. Jersey AM, Foster DM. Cerebral Aneurysm. [Updated 2021 Aug 10]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2022 Jan-.