Oliguria overview

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

Overview

Oliguria and anuria are the decreased or absent production of urine, respectively.

Oliguria is defined as a urine output that is less than 1 mL/kg/h in infants,[1] less than 0.5 mL/kg/h in children,[1] and less than 400 mL[1] or 500 mL[2] per 24h in adults - this equals 17 or 21 mL/hour. For example, in an adult weighing 70 kg it equals 0.24 or 0.3 ml/hour/kg. Alternatively, however, the value of 0.5 mL/kg/h is commonly used to define oliguria in adults as well.[2]

Olig- (or oligo-) is a Greek prefix meaning small or few.[3]

Anuria is defined as less than 50mL urine output per day.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Klahr S, Miller S (1998). "Acute oliguria". N Engl J Med. 338 (10): 671–5. doi:10.1056/NEJM199803053381007. PMID 9486997. Free Full Text.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Merck manuals > Oliguria Last full review/revision March 2009 by Soumitra R. Eachempati
  3. http://biology.about.com/od/prefixesandsuffixeso/g/blo3.htm



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