Low density lipoprotein historical perspective

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Cafer Zorkun, M.D., Ph.D. [2]; Rim Halaby, M.D. [3]

Overview

From the early 1950s onward, Fredrickson specialized in the study of plasma lipoproteins, compounds of proteins and lipids which transport lipids in the blood. However, the study of lipids in the blood has started early in the 1900's. In 1949, Faraday Society in Birmingham organized the first symposium on lipoproteins and separated for the first time lipoproteins into alpha and beta types. In 1950, LDL was first isolated.[1] In 1973, Myant first hypothesized the role of LDL in the metabolism of cholesterol.[2]

Historical Perspective

  • In 1949, a new method for quantitative measurement of LDL and other lipoproteins using ultracentrifuge was developed.[3]
  • In 1950, LDL was first isolated.[1]
  • In 1963, another lipoprotein, Lp(a), was discovered as a complex particle in human plasma in an immunochemical study.[4]
  • In 1973, Myant first hypothesized the role of LDL in the metabolism of cholesterol.[2]
  • In 1979, the Lipid Research Clinics Coronary Primary Prevention Trial (LRC-CPPT) demonstrated that reductions in total cholesterol and LDL were associated with reduction in coronary heart disease risk. It was reported that a 25% reduction in cholesterol or a 35% reduction in LDL cholesterol resulted in a 49% decrease in coronary heart disease risk.[5][6]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 "http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ja01157a121". Retrieved 8 November 2013. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 Myant NB (1973). "Cholesterol metabolism.". J Clin Pathol Suppl (Assoc Clin Pathol). 5: 1–4. PMC 1436101Freely accessible. PMID 4354844. 
  3. GOFMAN, JW.; LINDGREN, FT.; ELLIOTT, H. (1949). "Ultracentrifugal studies of lipoproteins of human serum.". J Biol Chem. 179 (2): 973–9. PMID 18150027. 
  4. BERG, K. (1963). "A NEW SERUM TYPE SYSTEM IN MAN--THE LP SYSTEM.". Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand. 59: 369–82. PMID 14064818. 
  5. "Plasma lipid distributions in selected North American populations: the Lipid Research Clinics Program Prevalence Study. The Lipid Research Clinics Program Epidemiology Committee.". Circulation. 60 (2): 427–39. 1979. PMID 312704. 
  6. "The Lipid Research Clinics Coronary Primary Prevention Trial results. I. Reduction in incidence of coronary heart disease.". JAMA. 251 (3): 351–64. 1984. PMID 6361299. 




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