Hemorrhoids historical perspective

Jump to: navigation, search

Hemorrhoids Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Hemorrhoids from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

X Ray

CT

MRI

Ultrasound

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Hemorrhoids historical perspective On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Hemorrhoids historical perspective

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Hemorrhoids historical perspective

CDC on Hemorrhoids historical perspective

Hemorrhoids historical perspective in the news

Blogs on Hemorrhoids historical perspective

Directions to Hospitals Treating Hemorrhoids

Risk calculators and risk factors for Hemorrhoids historical perspective

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Ahmed Younes M.B.B.CH [2]

Overview

Hemorrhoids were first discovered by ancient Egyptians more than 3,700 years ago.

Historical Perspective

  • Hemorrhoids were known 3,700 years ago by ancient Egyptians. A recipe for an ointment made of ground acacia leaves was described in an ancient Egyptian manuscript.
  • The ancient Greek medical textbook “Hippocratic Corpus” described a maneuver that is similar to rubber band ligation as we know it today.
  • Roman encyclopedist Aulus Cornelius Celsus described band ligation and discussed possible complications. The Roman surgeon Galen suggested severing the connection between arteries and veins in an attempt to relieve the pain and the spread of infection.
  • During the sixth century, hemorrhoids were known as Saint Fiacre’s curse after a saint who developed them after working in his farm.
  • In 1398, the word “hemorrhoids” was first used in English after the French word “emorroides,” which developed from the Latin word “hæmorrhoida”. "Hæmorrhoida" means liable to bleeding.

References



Linked-in.jpg