Diltiazem

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Diltiazem
CARDIZEM tablet® FDA Package Insert
Indications and Usage
Dosage and Administration
Dosage Forms and Strengths
Contraindications
Warnings
Precautions
Adverse Reactions
Drug Interactions
Use in Specific Populations
Overdosage
Description
Clinical Pharmacology
Nonclinical Toxicology
Clinical Studies
How Supplied/Storage and Handling
Patient Counseling Information
Labels and Packages
CARDIZEM LA tablet extended release® FDA Package Insert
Indications and Usage
Dosage and Administration
Dosage Forms and Strengths
Contraindications
Warnings
Precautions
Adverse Reactions
Drug Interactions
Use in Specific Populations
Overdosage
Description
Clinical Pharmacology
Nonclinical Toxicology
How Supplied/Storage and Handling
Labels and Packages
DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE injection® FDA Package Insert
Indications and Usage
Dosage and Administration
Dosage Forms and Strengths
Contraindications
Warnings
Precautions
Adverse Reactions
Drug Interactions
Use in Specific Populations
Overdosage
Description
Clinical Pharmacology
Nonclinical Toxicology
How Supplied/Storage and Handling
Patient Counseling Information
Labels and Packages
Clinical Trials on Diltiazem
ClinicalTrials.gov

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-In-Chief: Abdurahman Khalil, M.D. [2]

For patient information about Diltiazem, click here.

Synonyms / Brand Names:

Cardizem®, Cardizem® CD, Cardizem® LA, Cardizem® SR, Cartia® XT, Dilacor® XR, Dilt-CD®, Diltzac®, Taztia® XT, Tiamate®, Tiazac®.

Overview

Diltiazem is a nondihydropyridine (non-DHP) member of the class of drugs known as calcium channel blockers, used in the treatment of hypertension, angina pectoris, and some types of arrhythmia. It is a benzothiazepine, which differentiates it from the other classes of non-DHP calcium channel blockers such as the phenylalkylamines.

Category

Calcium channels blockers.

FDA Package Insert

CARDIZEM®

Indications and Usage | Dosage and Administration | Dosage Forms and Strengths | Contraindications | Warnings and Precautions | Adverse Reactions | Drug Interactions | Use in Specific Populations | Overdosage | Description | Clinical Pharmacology | Nonclinical Toxicology | Clinical Studies | How Supplied/Storage and Handling | Patient Counseling Information | Labels and Packages

CARDIZEM LA extended release®

Indications and Usage | Dosage and Administration | Dosage Forms and Strengths | Contraindications | Warnings | Precautions | Adverse Reactions | Drug Interactions | Use in Specific Populations | Overdosage | Description | Clinical Pharmacology | Nonclinical Toxicology | Clinical Studies | How Supplied/Storage and Handling | Patient Counseling Information | Labels and Packages

DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE injection®

Indications and Usage | Dosage and Administration | Dosage Forms and Strengths | Contraindications | Warnings | Precautions | Adverse Reactions | Drug Interactions | Use in Specific Populations | Overdosage | Description | Clinical Pharmacology | Nonclinical Toxicology | Clinical Studies | How Supplied/Storage and Handling | Patient Counseling Information | Labels and Packages

Mechanism of Action

Although precise mechanisms of its antianginal action are still being delineated, CARDIZEM is believed to act in the following ways:

1. Angina Due to Coronary Artery Spasm. CARDIZEM has been shown to be a potent dilator of coronary arteries both epicardial and subendocardial. Spontaneous and ergonovine-induced coronary artery spasm are inhibited by CARDIZEM.

2. Exertional Angina. CARDIZEM has been shown to produce increases in exercise tolerance, probably due to its ability to reduce myocardial oxygen demand. This is accomplished via reductions in heart rate and systemic blood pressure at submaximal and maximal exercise workloads.

In animal models, diltiazem interferes with the slow inward (depolarizing) current in excitable tissue. It causes excitation-contraction uncoupling in various myocardial tissues without changes in the configuration of the action potential. Diltiazem produces relaxation of coronary vascular smooth muscle and dilation of both large and small coronary arteries at drug levels which cause little or no negative inotropic effect. The resultant increases in coronary blood flow (epicardial and subendocardial) occur in ischemic and nonischemic models and are accompanied by dose-dependent decreases in systemic blood pressure and decreases in peripheral resistance.

References


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