Concussion classification

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

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Overview

Concussion falls under the classification of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI).[1] It is not clear whether concussion is implied in mild brain injury or mild head injury.[2] "MTBI" and "concussion" are often treated as synonyms in medical literature. However, other injuries such as intracranial hemorrhages (e.g. intra-axial hematoma, epidural hematoma, and subdural hematoma) are not necessarily precluded in MTBI or mild head injury,[3][4] but they are in concussion.[5] MTBI associated with abnormal neuroimaging may be considered "complicated MTBI". "Concussion" can be considered to imply a state in which brain function is temporarily impaired and "MTBI" to imply a pathophysiological state, but in practice few researchers and clinicians distinguish between the terms. Descriptions of the condition, including the severity and the area of the brain affected, are now used more often than "concussion" in clinical neurology.[6]

References

  1. Lee LK (2007). "Controversies in the sequelae of pediatric mild traumatic brain injury". Pediatric Emergency Care. 23 (8): 580–583. doi:10.1097/PEC.0b013e31813444ea. PMID 17726422.
  2. Benton AL, Levin HS, Eisenberg HM (1989). Mild Head Injury. Oxford [Oxfordshire]: Oxford University Press. pp. v. ISBN 0-19-505301-X.
  3. van der Naalt J (2001). "Prediction of outcome in mild to moderate head injury: A review". Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology. 23 (6): 837–851. doi:10.1076/jcen.23.6.837.1018. PMID 11910548.
  4. Savitsky EA, Votey SR (2000). "Current controversies in the management of minor pediatric head injuries". American Journal of Emergency Medicine. 18 (1): 96–101. doi:10.1016/S0735-6757(00)90060-3. PMID 10674544.
  5. Parikh S, Koch M, Narayan RK (2007). "Traumatic brain injury". International Anesthesiology Clinics. 45 (3): 119–135. doi:10.1097/AIA.0b013e318078cfe7. PMID 17622833.
  6. Larner AJ, Barker RJ, Scolding N, Rowe D (2005). The A-Z of Neurological Practice: a Guide to Clinical Neurology. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. p. 199. ISBN 0521629608.

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