References

(Redirected from Citations)
Jump to: navigation, search

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

Overview

WikiDoc has a reference manager that allows users to insert references based upon their PubMed ID number. If you move the text, the reference moves with it! All the references are automatically inserted at the bottom. You click on the reference and you go to the article. It is simple!

Where do I type in the references?

Usually you would type a number in the text like this (1) or this 1 which refers to a reference you would like to cite. You would then type in the reference at the end of the article. This is not the preferred method in WikiDoc.

WikiDoc features an automated reference manager. The advantages of this reference manager are that:

  1. The references are numbered automatically!
  2. When you move the text, the reference moves with it!
  3. You can click on the reference and go directly to the article!

Unlike the usual format where you type in the references at the end of the article, when you use the WikiDoc reference manager, you insert code for the reference right after the material you want to add a reference to. You use a software program to add in the references. The next section describes how to use the software program.

Using the WikiDoc reference manager

One goal of WikiDoc is to create reference lists that allow you to click on the PubMed ID number at the end of the reference and go to the primary article itself. This greatly facilitates locating references. Therefore, the preferred method of citing references includes the use of a reference manager that uses the PubMed ID number to create the reference. The reference manager uses not only PubMed IDs but also DrugBank ID, HGNC ID, ISBN, PubMed ID, PubMed Central ID, PubChem ID, or URLs.

The preferred method for inserting a reference is as follows:

Step 1: Use PubMed to locate the article you are interested in by clicking here

Step 2: Copy the PubMed ID number from the article. The word PubMed ID is often abbreviated PMID and this number is located at the bottom of the abstract. You can use the search function on Firefox or Internet explorer to locate the word PMID and the number will follow this abbreviation. It will look something like this:

PMID: 19032997

Step 3: Paste the PubMed ID number (PMID) into a software program that creates the Wiki language code for the reference you are going to paste into the text of your article. You can access software for converting a pubmed ID number from one of the following:

Step 4: When using the reference manager, make sure the button that says add ref tag is checked

Step 5: Press submit to generate the Wiki language that can be inserted in your article.

Step 6: Copy the Wiki language from the software program. For example, the output for the PMID above (19032997) is as follows:

<ref name="pmid19032997">{{cite journal |author=Gibson CM, Pride YB, Frederick PD, ''et al.'' |title=Trends in reperfusion strategies, door-to-needle and door-to-balloon times, and in-hospital mortality among patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction enrolled in the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction from 1990 to 2006 |journal=Am. Heart J. |volume=156 |issue=6 |pages=1035–44 |year=2008 |month=December |pmid=19032997 |doi=10.1016/j.ahj.2008.07.029 |url=}}</ref>

Step 7: Paste this output from the reference manager software right where you want the superscript number to appear in the text.

For example, using the above reference, you might type something like this:

Gibson et al recently summarized the improvements made in clincial outcomes as a result of 15 years of quality improvement efforts in the NRMI registry <ref name="pmid19032997">{{cite journal |author=Gibson CM, Pride YB, Frederick PD, ''et al.'' |title=Trends in reperfusion strategies, door-to-needle and door-to-balloon times, and in-hospital mortality among patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction enrolled in the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction from 1990 to 2006 |journal=Am. Heart J. |volume=156 |issue=6 |pages=1035–44 |year=2008 |month=December |pmid=19032997 |doi=10.1016/j.ahj.2008.07.029 |url=}}</ref>

This would generate text that looks like this:

Gibson et al recently summarized the improvements made in clincial outcomes as a result of 15 years of quality improvement efforts in the NRMI registry[1]

  1. Gibson CM, Pride YB, Frederick PD; et al. (2008). "Trends in reperfusion strategies, door-to-needle and door-to-balloon times, and in-hospital mortality among patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction enrolled in the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction from 1990 to 2006". Am. Heart J. 156 (6): 1035–44. PMID 19032997. doi:10.1016/j.ahj.2008.07.029.  Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)

What if I don't want to use the reference manager? What if I just want to type the references in myself?

You are not required to use the reference manager. You can do the following:

Step 1: Place a <ref> ... </ref> immediately after the sentence where you want a footnote number to appear.

Step 2: Type the text of the note between the ref tags. For example if I typed this

This was on of the first articles I published <ref>J Fam Pract. 2000 Oct;49(10):921-3.</ref> 

It would appear as this

This was one of the first articles I published[1]

Note: If you intend on using the same manual reference more than once, you will need to assign a name to the reference. You can do this by writing <ref name="anythingyouwanthere"> ... </ref>. Your name can be anything you want. Without a name, every manual reference will be viewed as a unique reference. This means that a reference used multiple times will show up as multiple references instead of just the one.

How do I make the references appear at the bottom of the article?

The preferred method

Put the following code in:

==References==
{{Reflist|2}}

This will generate your references in small font, in two columns, with links to the original article and abstract. It will return text that looks like this:

  1. J Fam Pract. 2000 Oct;49(10):921-3.

Linked-in.jpg