Chest trauma

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WikiDoc Resources for Chest trauma

Articles

Most recent articles on Chest trauma

Most cited articles on Chest trauma

Review articles on Chest trauma

Articles on Chest trauma in N Eng J Med, Lancet, BMJ

Media

Powerpoint slides on Chest trauma

Images of Chest trauma

Photos of Chest trauma

Podcasts & MP3s on Chest trauma

Videos on Chest trauma

Evidence Based Medicine

Cochrane Collaboration on Chest trauma

Bandolier on Chest trauma

TRIP on Chest trauma

Clinical Trials

Ongoing Trials on Chest trauma at Clinical Trials.gov

Trial results on Chest trauma

Clinical Trials on Chest trauma at Google

Guidelines / Policies / Govt

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse on Chest trauma

NICE Guidance on Chest trauma

NHS PRODIGY Guidance

FDA on Chest trauma

CDC on Chest trauma

Books

Books on Chest trauma

News

Chest trauma in the news

Be alerted to news on Chest trauma

News trends on Chest trauma

Commentary

Blogs on Chest trauma

Definitions

Definitions of Chest trauma

Patient Resources / Community

Patient resources on Chest trauma

Discussion groups on Chest trauma

Patient Handouts on Chest trauma

Directions to Hospitals Treating Chest trauma

Risk calculators and risk factors for Chest trauma

Healthcare Provider Resources

Symptoms of Chest trauma

Causes & Risk Factors for Chest trauma

Diagnostic studies for Chest trauma

Treatment of Chest trauma

Continuing Medical Education (CME)

CME Programs on Chest trauma

International

Chest trauma en Espanol

Chest trauma en Francais

Business

Chest trauma in the Marketplace

Patents on Chest trauma

Experimental / Informatics

List of terms related to Chest trauma

Editor in Chief: Liudvikas Jagminas, M.D., FACEP [1] Phone: 401-729-2419

Synonyms and Keywords: Thoracic trauma

Overview

Chest trauma is a serious injury of the chest. Thoracic trauma is a common cause of significant disability and mortality.

Classification

Chest trauma can be classified as blunt or penetrating. Blunt and penetrating injuries have different pathophysiologies and clinical courses. Most blunt injuries are managed with relatively simple interventions like intubation and mechanical ventilation and chest tube insertion. Diagnosis of blunt injuries may be more difficult and require additional investigations such as CT scanning. Penetrating injuries often require surgery, and complex investigations are usually not needed to come to a diagnosis. Patients with penetrating trauma may deteriorate rapidly, but may also recover much faster than patients with blunt injury.

Specific Chest Injuries

Epidemiology and Demographics

Thoracic injuries account for approximately 25% of all trauma-related deaths.

References



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